Top Tips For Land Agents to Beat Holiday Stress

Few people understand how tough it is to be in the land real estate business during the holidays. You don’t just have a nine-to-five job, you’re working around the clock. You have to work around the schedules of the clients, which in many cases means early mornings, late nights, and weekends where you are barely home. And while December is notorious for being one of the worst months to sell land real estate, many people use the holiday free-time to look around for properties. Putting all this together can make the most wonderful time of the year into a nightmare.

So, with an increase in work and the holidays right around the corner, how is a successful land real estate agent supposed to stay on top of their work and also enjoy time with their friends and family? Below, we’ve rounded up some great ways to handle the holiday craziness.

Want to learn more about how to stay sane during the crazy holiday times? Be sure to check out RLI’s ALC-to-ALC teleconference ‘Being Your Best-Reduce Stress, Maximize Productivity, Stay Healthy’. A recording will be made available to everyone after the event. In the meantime, here are some quick tips to get you started:

1. Focus on your target audience.

You don’t want to spread yourself too thin during the holiday season. So instead of reaching out to every type of client that comes your way and running yourself ragged, try to focus on serious potential buyers and the projects you already have. This way, you can focus all your energy into projects that will have the best payout for you.

2. Budget

The holidays can be a stressful time on anybody’s wallet, but it can be especially hard on those in the land real estate business. Since income is tied to sales instead of a 9-to-5 paycheck, it can be hard to figure out how much money you’ll have to spend on presents and other holiday fun. If you haven’t tried budgeting before, now is a great time to start. Once you figure out how much you usually spend a month, you can get a conservative estimate about how much you’ll have leftover for the holidays. Here’s a link to learn more about budgeting.

3. Take Control of Your Time

Anyone who tells you “It must be great to be able to pick which hours you work!” has never worked in land real estate. You might not have to clock in from 9-5 Monday through Friday, but the hours can be grueling. Add on top of that family events, mass, pageants, shopping, and you’ve got a tight schedule.

While a huge part of working in land real estate revolves around the clients, there are some things you can do to reclaim your time. Scheduling meetings with clients as early in advance as possible will let you plan other things around it. And if you aren’t typically the most organized, now’s the time to change that (at least for the holiday season). You can use a physical planner or an online one, like Google Calendar. Seeing your time laid out in a planner is a great way to stay updated on what needs to be done and when.

4. Sleep

Sleep is the one thing that everyone thinks they can skimp on. Some people carry their lack of sleep like a badge of honor. Even though it might make you feel good to say “I’ve been working so hard, I only slept two hours last night!” getting no sleep can take a serious toll on your work and your health, which will hurt your career. Also, skimping on sleep is a guaranteed way to make your body more prone to catching a cold, which is the last thing you need during the holiday season.

5. Limit Time on Tech.

Do you ever feel like you spend all day answering texts and e-mails, but never actually get anything checked off of your to-do list? Even though it’s a necessary part of any job, technology can be a huge time waster. The real time-suckers are those e-mails that don’t require an instant reply. Try putting those aside to focus on projects that need your full attention and see how much extra time you have at the end of the day.

6. Eat Well.

We know this is tough to hear during the season of roast turkey, gingerbread cookies, and eggnog, but you’re going to need all the energy you have to make the most out of this time of year. Sugary treats can keep you up at night, limitng the time you have for the all-important sleep, and fatty foods can zap your energy. Does this mean you can only eat salads during the most delicious time of the year? Of course not! Making a few changes each day (switching soda for water, getting a side salad instead of fries, keeping healthy snacks with you) can make a huge difference. You’ll notice an increase in your energy and focus (and maybe even how your favorite pair of pants fit) in no time.

7. Remember What It’s All For.

Between all the stress, hard work, and tension that comes with the holidays, sometimes it’s easy to just want them to be over. But it’s important to keep in mind what makes the holidays so special. Think about your favorite part of the holidays. Is it eating a good meal with your family? Going to church Christmas morning? Unwrapping presents first thing in the morning? Whatever it is, remind yourself of those special moments whenever you can. Putting some pictures of good family times from previous Christmases around your work space can help bring holiday cheer into your day.

8. Cut yourself some slack.

Everyone has to make sacrifices during the holidays, especially people who work in land real estate. Maybe that means spending less time at work or having to skip a Christmas party with your friends. Don’t beat yourself up for not being able to do everything that everyone wants you to do. Remind yourself that no one is able to “do it all” during the holiday season.

 

Is Virtual Reality in the Future for Land Real Estate?

Nowadays, the technology in land real estate is looking more and more like something out of a science fiction movie. First, drones flew into popularity among landowners to take aerial pictures and film videos of properties (read more about drones here). Now, virtual reality tours are popping up on the internet, offering 360 views of properties and a more in-depth look at farm life than ever before. We’re going to take a look at this new technology and the pros and cons of investing in your own virtual tours.

First of all, what exactly is a virtual reality tour? You might be thinking of something out of The Jetsons. It’s much simpler than that. A virtual tour uses a combination of photographs and videos to allow someone to explore a location using their phone or computer. Recently, technology has become so advanced that some videos have a 360-degree feature where you can use your mouse to explore every inch of a property. Other companies are using virtual reality headsets so advanced that you feel like you are walking in the middle of an apple orchard when you are actually just standing in the middle of your living room.

One example of this new technology is FarmFoods360, a virtual reality site that lets you explore Canadian farms. There are sixteen different types of farms to tour, ranging from the usual (egg farms and fruit farms) to the unique (ratite, a type of flightless bird originally from South America). Videos with 360-degree access allow you to learn everything from how the animals are kept to how cabbage is harvested. If you click on Dairy Cow Farms, you can view the milking stations, the different types of stalls, and calf barns. Each tour is chock-full with enough facts about the livestock and crops to satisfy even the nosiest customer.

Even though virtual reality tours sound great, every technology has its drawbacks. Let’s take a look at the upsides and downsides of this new technology.

UPSIDES

-Clients can view properties from their own home. You can save yourself and your clients time and money by replacing in-person tours with online ones. They can view your properties from the comfort of their own couch. Also, having a virtual tour expands your working hours with no extra effort to you. Your virtual tour will be open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. It’s like a permanent open house!

-Food transparency. Have you noticed a new wave of customers who want to know exactly where their food came from and what is in it? More people than ever are interested in ‘food transparency’, where and how their food is raised.  In a 2015 Trace One survey, 91% of respondents said it’s important for them to know where their food comes from.Virtual tours let customers explore farms and see how their food is raised.

-Shareability. In the age of social media, it’s easier than ever to share information. With one click, you can share a link to your virtual tour to social media sites and high traffic blogs (like the REALTORS® Land Institute blog!). This is an easy way to reach out to new clients and keep current ones updated on your latest properties.

DOWNSIDES

-Virtual tours can be pricey. If you opt for more high-tech virtual reality equipment, it’s going to cost you. A VR computer can cost over $1,000, and high-end headsets can range from $50-$600. Even the cheaper options can end up being more expensive than you’d think. Matterport 3D Camera, a company that uses 3-D scanning to photograph properties, charges around $100 to $200 to capture a property. If you are selling multiple or large properties, this could get expensive fast.

-New tech glitches. Because virtual reality is so new, there are bound to be glitches. Some common glitches include blurry photos and broken links. Some people who use virtual reality headsets claim that the headsets gave them motion sickness if they kept them on for too long.

-The human touch. Some people prefer to walk around the properties they are considering buying and meeting the owners face-to-face. While virtual tours are better for convenience, there is something special about in person visits that can get lost online.   

Taking this all into consideration, are virtual reality tours worth it? Our answer is: yes. While it is a relatively new technology that can glitch and isn’t the cheapest option, virtual tours are simply the best marketing tool in our new world. Today’s customers value convenience and expertise, and virtual tours can give that to them.

Some people still don’t like the idea of virtual reality tours. Some people claim that they prefer the “authenticity” of a real visit instead of a virtual one, while other people are worried about the cost. There was a similar reluctance when drones were first introduced to the world of land real estate. Even though drones were able to get aerial shots of land that were previously impossible to get, almost no one bought a drone. The first commercial drones were outrageously expensive and required a license to fly them. Over time, the prices dropped and people discovered that drones could do more than just take great photos of land. Drones can track hurricanes, track wildlife, and take pictures of poachers.  Now, there are over 600,000 commercial drones in the air.

While some of the more high-end virtual reality equipment like headsets are out of the price range for the average land seller, there are simple and cheap ways to get on board with the newest wave of technology. Check out sites like YouVisit and Homes & Land  to learn about cost effective ways to incorporate virtual reality into your business.

Top Land Real Estate Blogs to Follow in 2018

Following land real estate blogs is one of the easiest ways to keep your land and business ahead of the game. The only hard part? Finding blogs with credible sources, useful information, and content that’s up-to-date with the latest real estate news. To help you get the best information for your land, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite land real estate blogs (we left out the RLI blog, since you’re already lucky enough to know about it if you’re reading this post!). In no particular order, here are our top land real estate blogs to follow in 2018:

1. Whitetail Properties blog, The Hunting Blog

Whitetail blog

 

 

This is the go-to blog for anything to do with hunting properties. Need advice about buying or selling hunting land? They’ve got that. Want to learn about the best spots to harvest big game? They’ve got that, too. If you own a hunting property or just love hunting, you have to be following this blog!

2. National Land Realty blog

National Land Realty blog

 

The clean layout of the National Land Realty blog makes it easy to find the articles you want. You can choose from categories like Investing, Ownership, Cabin & Home, and Hunting & Fishing. Our favorite category? Industry News, which will keep you updated on the latest technology and news you need to know. Many of the posts are from their agents, ensuring the authors have hands-on experience in the field.

3. LandThink blog

Land Think Blog

 

Want to make more money with your property? Then this blog is for you. These no-nonsense articles let you know exactly what steps you need to take to get the most out of your property. The “A Land Buyer’s Checklist” series lays out exactly what you need in order to increase a property’s value.

4. Land.com blog

Land.com

 

What’s great about this blog is the wide variety of topics they cover. While the Buying Land and Selling Land sections seem pretty straightforward, the articles in the other sections cover every topic under the sun, ranging from quail sustainability to prepping your home for a natural disaster to fly-fishing. Written by land real estate and ranch experts, you know you’re getting the best information.

5. Landhub.com

Land Hub Blog

 

This blog takes a look at the long-term effects of owning land real estate with articles like “Could Buying Land Be An Investment In Your Child’s Future?” and “What Kind of Damage Can Terminates Do To A Home?”. Be sure to follow this blog if you’re in the real estate game for the long haul. This blog is also chock-full of how-to material for everything from thinning timber to how to sell to Millennials. While this blog’s layout is a little different than the other blogs on this list, it has great information if you are willing to dig around a bit

6. Land Blog… Get The Dirt!

Land Blog

 

 

Did you read our 2017 round up of blogs to watch? You might notice this blog was featured in there as well! This blog is great for people who don’t want to be bombarded with articles. It gives you monthly articles about the nuts and bolts of being successful in the world of real estate. Kent Morris is an ALC (Accredited Land Consultant), so you know you can trust his advice.

7. Harvest Returns blog

Harvest Returns blog

 

Interested in investing in agriculture, but not sure where to begin? This blog breaks down the basics for you and follows the trends of investments and returns. You’ll get a crash course in investing from following this blog and learn all sorts of useful information. For example, did you know that US Farmland investments have a higher annual return than gold? The articles about the latest land laws and regulations are also important to read. They cut through the political jargon to get to the heart of the matter; how the new laws are going to affect you.

 

 

investment

Yes, You Should Invest in Land Real Estate

“I have always liked real estate; farmland, pastureland, timberland and city property. I have had experience with all of them. I guess I just naturally like ‘the good Earth,’ the foundation of all our wealth.” — Jesse Jones, entrepreneur

Real estate investors and buyers alike have always had an affinity for land. There is just something about land that draws in savvy investors. Whether it’s the innate, territorial tendencies we have deep within or the simple magnetism of connecting with nature in a world increasingly becoming cluttered with high rises and highways, our instincts are doing what they do best, pointing us in the right direction!

Whether its amber waves of grain or purple mountain majesties, land continues to prove be one of the most profitable long-term investments from sea to shining sea. The USDA’s 2017 Land Values Summary released in August shows that from 2010-2016 average farm real estate values have cumulatively increased 43 percent or an average of 6.1 percent annually and average cropland real estate values have cumulatively increased 51 percent or an average of 7.3 percent annually—that’s quite a return on investment! It’s no wonder smart investors are flocking to invest in the land real estate market.

RLI 2017 Land Markets Survey

In fact, the 2017 REALTORS® Land Institute Land Markets Survey shows that out of all buyers in land transactions, there was a five percent increase in those who were investors in just one year from 2015 to 2016. With so many different types of land to choose from when investing and so many different ways to invest in land, the possibilities are almost endless. If you aren’t sure where to start, just keep reading.

Hopefully by now I have your attention and you are no doubt wondering “why is land real estate such a hot investment?” There are a lot variables that can be mentioned here but the simple answer is best summed up by Mark Twain as “Buy land, they’re not making it anymore.” Compared to other investments, land can be purchased relatively cheap if you find a motivated seller. Being a limited resource and non-depreciable, it’s a fairly safe asset when looking for a solid return on a long-term investment.

invest in land

For those looking to invest in land real estate to diversify their portfolio, buy a property to retire on, or just get in on the action, there are a lot of great resources out there. Just keep in mind that when investing in land real estate, it is crucial to consult a professional with the experience and knowledge necessary to conduct these kinds of transactions. Land is a whole different animal than residential or commercial real estate and there are agents out there who dedicate themselves to being experts in this field. The REALTORS® Land Institute offers investors an easy to use search tool to find a qualified local agent called Find A Land Consultant, check it out and get started!

Jessa Friedrich, MBA, Marketing ManagerAbout the author: Jessa Friedrich, MBA, is the Marketing Manager for the REALTORS® Land Institute. Jessa has a Bachelor of Science with a dual major in Business Administration and Marketing as well as her MBA specializing in Marketing. She has been with RLI since March 2015 leading their marketing efforts.

 

Note: Information in this article should not be construed as recommendations for any course of legal, financial, or accounting action.

sage grouse

Sage Grouse Management in the News

I read the recent article noting that our new Secretary of the Interior was directing mangers of the public lands to include flexibility in their plans to improve on sage grouse habitats. This, and in other articles I have read, continue to reference “livestock grazing” as one of the reasons for the decline of the sage grouse. In one article, they cite the main reasons for the decline of the sage grouse: “In 2013, the FWS identified 14 threats to the greater sage grouse: nonnative invasive plants, energy development, sagebrush removal, improper grazing, range management structures, wild horses and burros, pinyon-juniper expansion, agricultural conversion, mining, recreation, urbanization, infrastructure and fences.”   Interestingly enough, they always leave out the one reason that probably has the most impact on sage grouse populations and that is “Predators.”

We have more predators of the sage grouse now than ever before and still most will not recognize them as a major factor. One predator in particular whose population has grown by a thousand percent is the raven. University studies since 1948 have shown ravens as major predators of ground nesting birds and a 2003-2005 study “The Effects of Raven Removal on Sage Grouse Nest Success” by Peter S. Coates and David J. Delehanty of Idaho State University confirms the benefits of taking Raven’s out of the picture for improved nest success.

sage grouseWhy not give credit where credit is due? Some believe it is because controlling predators won’t give the public lands managers the control on other resource users that using “critical habitat” does.  There are organizations in the West whose main goals are to interfere with livestock grazing on public lands. In Idaho, they are trying to have dirt tanks (ponds created to store water for livestock) filled in because they are used as breeding grounds by mosquitoes since they are carriers for the West Nile disease which is found to also kill sage grouse.  Any of us who spend a lot of time in the habitat will tell you that these same ponds are frequented by many species of wildlife that benefit from them, just a livestock do.

Many argue that there has been entirely too much time and money spent on improving “habitat” for sage grouse. Historical records indicate there were very few sage grouse in the Great Basin before man settled. The journals of early day settlers such as Peter Skeen Ogdon (1828-1829); Jedediah Smith (1827); John Charles Fremont (1843-45) pay a lot of attention to wildlife and the diets of the native American’s they encountered.  In all these journals, there was one record of sage grouse found as a diet item (RE: testimony of Nevada Assemblyman Ira Hansen 2011). In the meetings in 2012, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWL) was conducting a hearing on the potential listing of the sage grouse, they noted that they were using as a starting point the mid 1800’s and the areas they identified as sage brush areas at that time.  They were also using a two-million bird prediction based off that number of acres of sage brush.  In other words, the number of Sage Grouse being managed for is based on poor data that is not substantiated by historical records.

Livestock grazing can actually be a benefit to sage grouse and, if you look at the records, you will see that at the same time we had the most livestock on public lands is when we had the largest sage grouse populations. I believe mainly for two reasons:  first, we had an active predator control program at that same time; and second, over grazing of grass species allows shrubs to encroach onto those areas being overgrazed.

Livestock grazing kept the excess fuels down and we had fewer range fires. Managing for grass required leaving excess grass to reseed and I can tell you we have a lot more grass now than when I was a kid in the 1950’s and 60’s. In those days, we didn’t have government fire centers that did the firefighting, we did it ourselves. All the ranchers and other county residents would drop what they were doing when a fire started to put it out. That meant bull dozers being loaded and put on fire lines, it meant filling barrels with water, grabbing soaked seed sacks to slap out flames, and not stopping even at dark.  In fact, we usually got the fire under control at night as the winds calmed down and the moisture content of the air went up. We don’t have forests to deal with so fighting fires at night isn’t much danger.  Unfortunately, even today, the agencies who now control firefighting shut it down at dark and wait until after their 7 am fire meeting is over the next morning to get back to it. Changing this one policy would keep the size of our fires down considerably. To their credit, however, this year they are getting on the fires much sooner that they have in the past.

In summary and in my opinion  a)the sage grouse are not at a low enough population level to justify being listed as threatened or endangered;  b) the Critical Habitat Provision of the Endangered Species Act is being abused to list species whose populations don’t warrant listing; c) Livestock grazing is not a negative to the sage grouse; d)Predators are not even sited as one of the main impacts on the population even though there are numerous studies that show they are a large factor; e)the agency’s policy of not fighting fires in the Great Basin at night has burned literally hundreds of thousands of acres unnecessarily. On the other hand, I just sold a 10,000 acre ranch I had listed for over eight years to be used for sage grouse meditation with federal agencies. Suave on the sore!

About the author: Paul Bottari, ALC, is Owner/Broker for Bottari & Associates Realty Inc. in Wells, NV. Paul serves on the REALTORS® Land Institute 2017 Government Affairs Committee.

Turning Your Land Into Multiple Sources of Cash Income

Hey Land Owners, What Have You Been Waiting For? Turning Your Land Into Multiple Sources of Cash Income is Easier Than you Think!

We live in the age of AirBnB and VRBO mania. Residential owners across the globe are taking advantage of the need for residential renting opportunities. They post their properties on listing websites like AirBnB or VRBO, and quickly turn their residential properties into piles of instant cash income. Guess what? Land owners can do this too! There is an enormous demand for private land use of various types, in which users are willing to pay. It’s time for landowners to get in on the money making action too.

The demand for private land use across our great nation is nearly immeasurable. Simply put, an exponentially enormous portion of the population has the desire or need to use private land for various purposes. As an example, in addition to being President and CEO of LandLeaseExchange.com, I am also Vice President of Maury L. Carter & Associates, Inc., a land investment and brokerage firm based in Orlando, FL. Our firm and our investors have owned hundreds of thousands of acres over a 50+/- year time frame. We currently have a portfolio of 12,000 acres.

Every year we get hundreds, if not thousands of unsolicited phone calls and email inquiries on the 12,000 acres in our portfolio. These inquiries are from individuals or companies searching for property to lease or rent. Again, it is important that landowners understand just how much demand there is for the leasing and use of land. We DO NOT market our properties for lease, yet we receive all of these unsolicited inquiries from users who are ready, willing, and able to lease a property.

Most of the land in our portfolio that we lease is conducive for production agricultural farming, cattle leases, citrus leases, timber leases, and hunting leases. These are fairly standard land leasing categories, yet they are just the “tip of the iceberg” when it comes to the possibilities available to landowners and how they can turn their land assets into cash revenue. The land leasing market has been identified as an extremely under-served marketplace. What am I saying? There are tens of millions of people in the U.S. that have a need for land, yet there isn’t even a small fraction of land available to them to do so. Enter the private landowner.

On the LandLeaseExchange.com side of things, I have many landowners say to me “John, all I have is (enter amount of land) acres, and there really isn’t much I can do with it to make money.” Really? I beg to differ. Each parcel of land is different and offers its own uses based upon its characteristics. Landowners don’t really need to get too creative, actually. They simply need to take advantage of the land they already own and provide leasing opportunities to users that are conducive to the characteristics of the land owned.

As land owners, we have to think outside of the box. We have opportunities that we take for granted, available to us RIGHT NOW on the land we own, that others are willing to pay to for to experience.

Here is a list of examples I have compiled. Remember, you can lease your entire property, or just a portion. For one use, or for many uses. No property is too big, or too small to turn into cash income.

Agricultural Opportunities

  • Do you have land that you aren’t currently using that could be leased for agricultural purposes? Whatever agricultural use your land is conducive for, the likelihood of someone wanting to use it for commercial agricultural purposes is high. Our website offers listing categories on anything from citrus to peaches to tomatoes to more traditional commodities like soy beans, corn and cotton.

Recreational Opportunities

  • Birdwatching, camping, equestrian, fishing, hiking, hunting, mountain bike trail riding, RV/Motor Home/Camper, Shooting, Off-Road Trail Riding/ATV/Motorcross, Waterfront properties, and more. Recreational use is one of the most desired uses for land right now.

Special Event/Corporate Retreats/Religious Retreats

  • Do you have an old barn you could clean up, hang some lights and rent for weddings or parties? Brides and grooms and party hosts want to create something different and unique while hosting their parties.
  • Corporate retreats – Does your land have activities available? Skeet shooting, hunting opportunities, adequate lodging amenities, meeting areas, etc.? Turn it into a corporate retreat and charge companies to use your property.
    Cabins, Rural Residences, Estates:
  • People want to have a getaway weekend or an experience on a farm, ranch or property outside of the city. Provide the opportunity to them by leasing out cabins, rural residences or estate properties.

Agri-Tourism Sites

  • Now, more than ever, people want the opportunity to get on land, see where their food is coming from, visit the farm and experience something outdoors and have a good time. What type of agritourism can you provide? U-Picks, corn mazes, pumpkin patches, vineyards, petting zoos, Christmas Tree U-Cut, etc.

Communications and Energy

  • Do you have a site that would be perfect for a cell phone tower?
  • Are you located near high tension power lines and you think your property would be good for a solar panel project?
  • What about a road, and your property would be good to lease to a billboard company?

All of the above are ideas on how to turn your land into cash revenue. As a landowner, what are you waiting for? Additional cash income is only a few clicks away!

 

About the Author: John Evans is a 2008 graduate of the University of Mississippi with a degree in real estate finance. A seventh-generation Floridian, he lives in Winter Park, FL, with wife Ann and son Jack, 1. He is Vice President of Maury L. Carter & Associates, Inc and founder, CEO and President of Land Lease Exchange, LLC. which is an online marketing tool that connects landowners to land users.

 

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new home residential land real estate

An Increase in Demand for Residential Land Real Estate

“Under All Is The Land,” starts the National Association of REALTORS® Code of Ethics. Whether a property is residential, commercial, or of a more rural variety, it all starts from the ground up—literally. With almost all properties needing land on some level, it’s no wonder the demand for residential land real estate continues to grow. As John D. Rockefeller once said “The major fortunes in America have been made in land,” and any land agent would agree that land real estate makes one of the best investments for that reason.

Let’s take a closer look at all the buzz about an increase in demand for residential land real estate. REALTOR® Magazine recently released a piece called “Best Year For New Construction In A Decade?” The article focuses on HousingWire’s prediction that “growing buyer demands will likely spark home builders to construct [more] homes this year than in the last decade.” In addition, the REALTORS® Land Institute released their annual Land Market Survey for 2017 which shows that 25 percent of all closed land transactions over the past year were for residential use. The survey also shows a 5 percent increase in total dollar volume of closed residential land transactions compared to the previous year, meaning the number of residential land transactions are up from the previous year.

residential land real estateEven those in the field are seeing it all firsthand. For example, in the article “The Evolution of Residential Land Sales in the Northeast,” recently published in RLI’s Summer 2017 Terra Firma magazine, expert Accredited Land Consultant Michael Durkin observed “Land prices [in the Northeast] are escalating higher and higher almost to the point of spiraling out of control.” As the demand for land continues to rise, it only makes sense that the prices of land will follow in the affected areas. In fact, RLI’s Land Market Survey showed a 2 percent average increase in residential land prices over the previous year and majority of respondents expect prices to continue increasing over the coming year.

So where are the strongest markets for residential land real estate transactions? The REALTOR® Magazine article points out that “The Midwest and Northeast will likely see the most uptick in new-home construction.” This prediction falls in line with RLI’s Land Market Survey results which show the Northeast leading in residential land sales. Survey participants also expect a three percent increase in residential land sales for the coming year; so, the future is looking bright as well!

All this information may lead one to question, why is there suddenly an increasing number of residential land real estate transactions? Lawrence Yun, the National Association of REALTORS®’ chief economist, explained in the REALTOR® Magazine article that “the increase in new housing would be a much needed relief to the overall housing market” which is currently facing a housing shortage.

Looking at NAR’s “2017 Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends Report,” Millennials and Gen Yers make up 34 percent of home buyers and are currently driving an increased demand for affordable housing. On the other hand, Baby Boomers are the second largest group of home buyers making up 30 percent of recent buyers. The report also shows that overall 14 percent of buyers opted for a new home versus a previously occupied one, an increase over the previous year adding to the demand for residential land real estate.

In the end one thing is for certain, as the demand for more housing continues to grow, it only follows that the demand for more land will track up with it as will land values.

The annual REALTORS® Land Institute and NAR Research Land Markets Survey is a tool for land real estate professionals, owners, and investors across all sectors of the business to use for bench-marking and as an informational resource when conducting business. View the full survey here. Read more on this topic from REALTOR® Mag in their follow-up piece on this post “The Demand for Land Widens.”

Jessa Friedrich, Marketing Manager, REALTORS Land InstituteAbout the author: Jessa Friedrich, MBA, is the Marketing Manager for the REALTORS® Land Institute. Jessa has a Bachelor of Science with a dual major in Business Administration and Marketing as well as a Masters of Business Administration in Marketing with a specialization in Social Media. She has been with RLI in the land real estate industry for two and a half years and manages all matters pertaining to marketing and communications for the organization. In her role, she is dedicated to promoting and enhancing the valuable benefits of an RLI membership to the land real estate industry and ensuring RLI continues to be “The Voice of Land.”

Be An Intentional Real Estate Networker

It happens to all of us!  We attend a conference and we are pumped to network — fully armed with a new box of business cards, excited about the all the like-minded business leaders we are about to meet.  We meet energetic people who are passionate about land transactions, and start to collect brilliant ideas – and business cards – to bring home like souvenirs.  Let’s be real, we are so blown away by the talented associates we meet along the way, we think that there is no way that we will forget that face and the incredible value they provided during the brief interactions.  When we get home, the face, value and promised follow-up morphs into a big stack of ambiguity.

land real estate professionals networking at the 2015 national land conferenceWe know that our biggest strengths are often our biggest weaknesses and too many outstanding connections is a problem I am happy to tackle!  I am taking steps to be more intentional about my networking and more importantly, my follow-up. Join me in my quest to be an intentional networker!

Have a Networking Mission and Goal
Is your mission to build your referral business or to attract talent? Be focused about this mission and then set a goal to achieve this mission. Networking is lead generation and you are already a pro. Determine how many people you want to meet and track this number each day. What we focus on expands!

Identify and Leverage a System
Before heading to any networking event, create your system for follow-up. If a connection is a brief encounter that involves a business card, write a quick note on the back of the card so that you have context for any follow-up or notes that should be added to your database. Leverage an assistant or technology to track your follow-up. Using Evernote or assigning yourself Outlook Tasks are great ways to ensure you do what you say you will do when you return home.

Digitize Your Business Card Collection
The dreaded stack of business cards does not have to be a dread.  Technology is your leverage! Check out these tips from PC World on how to digitize business cards. Transfer these contacts to your phone AND your database.

Use Your Database
Your database is not just for clients, it’s for your network too. Add a tag or bucket for RLI Referrals for all of your new connections. Create a monthly touch campaign for your fellow RLI members from afar that includes fun tips about your city, a recap of key takeaways from your last RLI Chapter training or updates about your business. You will be front of mind when one of your contacts has a client interested in your area.

land real estate professionals networking at the 2016 national land conferenceWork Your Calendar
If it’s not on our calendar, it doesn’t exist. This goes for networking too! Before attending any networking event, make a list of the people you want to meet. This could be an actual name or it could be that you wish to connect with someone from a certain state. Leverage the RLI Membership Portal to collect contact information. Then, reach out to these associates ahead of time to schedule a coffee break to connect one on one. Don’t forget, conference events are perfect for meeting new people.

Be Social
Keep in touch and stay front of mind by connecting with your new contacts on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social channels. A “like,” retweet or comment will keep you in the networking game — even from afar. More importantly, engage with your connections through all the benefits being a member of RLI offers you.

There will always be a new opportunity to implement these best practices to help with more intentional networking.  Stay connected!

About the author: Holly Priestner, Director of Talent Acquisition at Keller Williams, has never met a stranger, literally. Her enthusiasm for people and their stories enables her to connect people to resources that can make both their professional and personal dreams come true. This is advantageous when recruiting top talent to KWRI, with recruits quickly recognizing that their goals matter to Holly and that she cares about their happiness and success. Attend Holly’s webinar Elevate Your Elevator Pitch hosted by the REALTORS® Land Institute on March 8.

ALC Shadow over dirt

Why Use an Accredited Land Consultant?

When it comes time to buy or sell a property, having the best in the business representation is invaluable. Using an Accredited Land Consultant guarantees clients that they are represented by the most knowledgeable, experienced, well-connected, and trustworthy land professionals in the country.

What is in ALC?
An Accredited Land Consultant, or ALC, is a land real estate broker or agent who has completed a rigorous Land University (LANDU) Education Program through the REALTORS® Land Institute, an affiliate of the National Association of REALTORS®. All ALCs have met a high level of experience and transaction volume requirements ensuring their expertise when it comes to conducting and closing real estate deals. On top of having a proven and unparalleled level of expertise and experience, ALCs are required to adhere to the ALC Code of Conduct, which assures high ethical standards, in order to maintain their elite status as an ALC and ensure their clients best interest take priority.

Accredited Land ConsultantsExpertise
ALCs understand the value of being the expert on all matters pertaining to a client’s transaction. Land transactions, in particular, require specialized knowledge and familiarity with the industry to competently ensure the client’s best interests are met.  From understanding the various legal aspects of a transaction to applying knowledge of soil types, investment analysis, timberland valuation, recreational or agricultural land management, acquiring land for residential development, and more, ALCs are certified to have the expertise needed to represent their clients.

Experience
As the old saying goes, “there is no teacher like experience.” Which is why to become an ALC, applicants must submit a resume that demonstrates a minimum of two years of experience in land sales or brokerage or a minimum of three years of comparable real estate experience. They must also prove experience in at least five closed land transactions totaling $10,000,000, or a total of twenty-five separate land transactions.

Networking
One key to success that many clients overlook is having a broker or agent that is well connected with other brokers / agents across the country. Whether it is to tap their pool of buyers seeking to purchase a property or to gain additional insights into best practices or specialized knowledge, having a large network of other highly qualified ALCs and best in the business land brokers through the REALTORS® Land Institute is invaluable.

Ethical Integrity
Accredited Land Consultants are honorable land professionals who recognize the importance of land to life. ALCs share in the responsibility to conduct themselves with high morals following the ALC Code of Conduct and the Code of Ethics of the National Association of REALTORS®.

  1. Protect and promote the best interest of clients
  2. Display high moral and professional standards
  3. Avoid exaggeration and misrepresentation of relevant facts
  4. Treat all with honesty and respect
  5. Stay current in industry knowledge and trends
  6. Enhance the integrity and professionalism of the industry
  7. Cooperate with fellow real estate professionals
  8. Follow local, state, and national laws regarding disclosure
  9. Will not condone or participate in discriminatory practices
  10. Support, understand, and champion RLI policies

The ALC Designation gives clients and their brokers the confidence to competently buy and sell land. To find an Accredited Land Consultant, visit rliland.com/find-a-land-consultant. For more information on becoming an ALC, visit rliland.com/accredited-land-consultant-designation.

Jessa Friedrich, MBA, Marketing ManagerAbout the Author: Jessa Friedrich, MBA, is the Marketing Manager for the REALTORS® Land Institute. She has an Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Marketing as well as her MBA in Marketing with a specialization in Social Media.