What’s All The Buzz About Bees and Land Real Estate?

Bees in America have been dropping like flies. Since the late 1990s, beekeepers, farmers, and scientists have noticed a steady decline in the bee population across the country. Before 2006, the usual number of bees that beekeepers lost due to frost or disease was 5-10 percent. After 2006, beekeepers saw that number rise to between a 30 to 36 percent decline in their hives. Panic really set in when a US report stated that American beekeepers lost 44.1 percent of their hives between March 2015 and April 2016.

So, what does this have to do with the land real estate market? Losing bees could have devastating effects on our farms, economy, and day-to-day life. As food pollinators, bees play a huge part in almost everything we eat and everything that our food (cows, pigs, turkeys, etc.) eats. Without them, landowners would lose the most efficient and cost-effective pollinators on Earth, driving the cost of farming and food way up. Farmers would have to invest in expensive pollination technology. If they couldn’t afford the technology, farmers would be severely limited in what crops they could grow since bees pollinate thirty percent of the world’s crops.

The loss of bees could also be disastrous for land values. Crops, livestock, and wildlife will drop in numbers and value without the bees around to pollinate the plants and food sources of the land. Since the value of land real estate relies heavily on the profitability of the land and its natural resources, a drop in bee population could mean a huge drop in land values.

No one knows the main reason bee populations are dropping, but there are several factors scientists believe are hurting our winged friends. A growing number of varroa mites, tiny crab-like parasites, have been feeding off of drone bees and can kill off entire hives. These mites are tiny and hard to spot, which lets them destroy hives from the inside out without anyone noticing until it is too late. Another possible reason is neonicotinoids, a powerful insecticide that slowly weakens bees.

People have been scrambling to find ways to help the honeybees. Almond growers in California are trying to breed more blue orchard bees (B.O.B.s). The blue orchard bees are known for being excellent pollinators. They are more efficient than regular honey bees; a few hundred female blue orchard bees can do the same amount of work as 10,000 regular honey bees.

Although introducing a new breed of bee sounds like a great idea, there are a few drawbacks to the blue orchard bee. For one, they do not produce honey. Another is that they have sluggish reproduction rates (bee keepers have only been able to increase their B.O.B.s a factor of three to eight every year, a tiny fraction of how quickly honey bees can be increased), so getting enough for the current American demand for bees might be tough. The cost of raising B.O.B.s is also still uncertain.

Technology also offers hope for the bees. Robo-bees may sound like something from a sci-fi moive, but in Japan, they are already a reality. Japanese scientists have created a remote-controlled drone the size of a dragonfly. These robo-bees are able to pollinate lilies and are currently being retooled to pollinate other crops. U.S. scientists say a similar product in is the works right here in our own country.

These robo-bees also have their drawbacks. They would be significantly more expensive than raising honeybees, and the risk of malfunctioning could leave fields without pollination for days or even weeks on end.

While the rest of the world is trying to figure out a cure for this epidemic, there are things you can do to help the bees:

Grow flowers that attract bees.  Lavender, white clover, and thyme can all help attract bees to your farm.

-Build a hive or sponsor one. Vice President Mike Pence had a beehive in his backyard and encourages others to do the same. Don’t like the idea of bees buzzing around where you go barefoot? You can also support a hive through websites like the Honeybee Conservancy  to help give bees a safe place to thrive.

-Make your land real estate bee-friendly. Besides planting bee-friendly flowers, you can also invest in pesticides that don’t harm bees.

The decline in bee population is a serious threat to everyone. However, with a raised awareness, people are starting to understand how important bees are to our food and land real estate. Because of this, there is hope that the bee population across America will be able to grow again.

About the author: Laura Barker is Marketing Assistant for the REALTORS® Land Institute. She graduated from Clark University in May 2017 and had been with RLI since October 2017.

How To Have a Great Hunt in February

 

By the end of January, most people have put away their guns and declared the hunting season over. February is one of the slower months for hunting. However, if you still have an itch to hunt, there are plenty of hunting opportunities for you in February. Here are some tips to help you have a great hunting season even after January is over.

1: Don’t Count Out Small Game

Deer season might be over, but there are still plenty of clever critters that will make for an exciting hunt. In many states, hunting small animals like rabbits and squirrels is legal throughout February. If you haven’t hunted squirrels before, it might not sound as exciting as hunting an elk or a wild boar. However, since the winter and the earlier hunting season have already claimed some of the weaker ones, the remaining squirrels will be cunning and make for a rewarding hunt. Rabbits are also a challenging hunt. They are one of the more popular small games to hunt, and it’s easy to see why. They have an excellent sense of smell and long-distance vision that only the most skilled hunters can know how to trick. If you are looking for a hunt that will challenge your brain as well as your hunting skills, small game could be your new favorite prey.

2: Some Animals Can Be Hunted Year-Round

While this does vary state by state, most states allow year-round hunting of animals that are considered pests or could harm the ecosystem of the land. Wild pigs and coyotes are some of the more popular animals to hunt year-round. Coyotes are highly intelligent and adaptable animals that have gotten a passionate following over the years in the hunting community.

Also, wild pigs can be hunted year-round in twelve states (California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, Wisconsin). These husky creatures have an unpredictable temper, so only go after them if you are an experienced and thrill-seeking hunter.

3: Check Your Calendar

Depending on where you live, you might have more time to hunt big game than you think. Alabama allows deer hunting until February 10th, thanks to the varying rutting seasons around the state. Hunting seasons can shrink or grow based off population, rutting season, and the needs of the land.

4: Hunt Smarter, Not Harder

Every hunting season has its ups and downs. Hunting in February is no different. Fewer hunters means less competition for you. The barren land and fallen leaves mean you will have an excellent view of your prey. The catch? They can see you just as clearly. This is the time of year to break out your best camo.

Another drawback for hunting in February is that most of the prime hunt has already been harvested. January hunters have taken out the biggest game, and Mother Nature has taken the animals not fit enough to survive the harsh winter season. You might have missed the biggest animals of the season, but there are still lots of animals out there ready to give you a memorable day in the great outdoors.

Hunting in February is for hunters who like a challenge. Even though you might not catch the buck of your dreams, there is still plenty of great hunting to be had.

About the author: Laura Barker is Marketing Assistant for the REALTORS® Land Institute. She graduated from Clark University in May 2017 and had been with RLI since October 2017.

What Does the Decline in Hunting Mean for Recreational Land Real Estate?

There’s nothing quite like hunting; the rush of adrenaline when you hit your target, teaching little ones how to spot a deer, and spending time in the great outdoors. Hunting also has surprising benefits for the environment. Hunting licenses and fees are the main source of income for wildlife agencies, and hunting can prevent overpopulation.

However, there has been a significant decrease in hunting over the years. Over the last five years, the number of hunters has decreased by 15 percent. What does this mean for recreational real estate and the future of hunting?

One of the biggest reasons for the decline in hunting is our country’s changing landscape. With the human population growing every day, prime land real estate started going towards building homes and stores instead of hunting grounds. Many old hunting spots that families have loved for generations have closed and been replaced by a mall.

 

http://longilbert.com/blog-and-updates/2017/4/14/what-is-the-cost-of-a-hunting-license

Another reason that less people are hunting is the cost. The rising price of ammunition, licenses, and permits are driving away hunters who can’t afford the price hike. As you can see from this chart from longilbert.com, the cost of hunting licenses is massive for non-residents. $250 license fees are pricing some people out of the sport. Even local license costs are skyrocketing. The Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission has proposed a fee increase that will raise resident license prices from $7 to a whopping $27. That’s a 26 percent increase!

Millennials haven’t been picking up the sport as much as other generations have. The biggest deterrent is that they don’t have anyone to teach them. “You don’t just get up and go hunting one day- your father or father-type figure has to have hunted,” says Mark Damian Duda, an executive director of the research firm Responsive Management. Hunting is a sport which requires a lot of teaching and expertise. With a growing number of Baby Boomers and Gen Xers hanging up their hunting vests, Millennials are left without anyone to introduce them to the sport.

There are a lot of downsides to the decrease in hunting. The group that suffers most from the lack of hunting is, surprisingly, the environment. Hunting can prevent over-population, which can wreck an ecosystem and leave animals starving as they compete for food. Hunting fees and licenses are the main source of income for many wildlife preserves and recreational land real estate. This income pays the employees, maintains the grounds, and funds projects to help the wildlife. Without this income, many parks are struggling to pay their bills.

Does the decreasing number of hunters mean the end for the sport? Not at all. There is still a very active hunting community and positive trends that show hunting increases in certain states. The same study that showed overall hunters decreasing also showed a 9 percent increase in hunting participation from 2006 to 2011. The number of paid hunting license holders has actually increased in certain states. In Texas, the number has jumped from 1,060,455 license holders in 2015 to 1,148,765 in 2017.

The local food movement has also helped the hunting community. With a focus on shopping local and knowing where your food comes from, this movement has introduced people to hunting as a fun and sustainable way to get your dinner.

Recreational land real estate is still going. In last year’s RLI survey, sales of recreational land actually increased. Recreational and residential land real estate sales accounted for 50 percent. While interest in the sport may waver, prices per acre of land real estate remain high. The average price for hunting land real estate in the Midwest is $2,975 per acre.

While hunting is experiencing a dip in popularity, there are still many loyal fans of hunting who want to bring it back into popularity. There have been efforts by local governments to make hunting affordable and accessible again. Ryan Zinke, the United States Secretary of Interior issued orders to overturn a ban of lead ammunition and issued an order to increase hunters’ access to public land. In the community, many youth groups are teaching young people about hunting and nature. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission launched the Youth Hunting Program of Florida to teach young people how to hunt safety.

Hunting is going through some changes. Most of them are positive. A new movement and generation are learning about the benefits of hunting and how it can help the environment. Local government are now realizing the effects of price hikes on hunting and are taking steps to change it. With a new focus on sustainability and teaching the next generation, hunting is sure to remain a classic American pastime.

What Are the Long-Term Effects of Natural Disasters on Land?

California has been under attack by wildfire. The North California fires in October destroyed over 245,000 acres of land and caused more than $1 billion in damages. The fires were so devastating that they have their own Wikipedia page. At the time this article is being written, the Southern California fires are still raging on. Currently, the fires have burned through almost 150,000 acres of land and counting. The losses are devastating, and the looming long-term effects from these wildfires are almost as bad as the fires themselves.  Many people assume that the worst of the damage is over when the natural disaster leaves. However, for those in the land real estate business, the trouble may just be starting.

The long-term effects of a natural disaster are tragic for everyone involved, especially those in the land real estate business. Wildfire does more than just burn down houses. It destroys crops, kills livestock, and scares wildlife away from hunting grounds. Wildfire can also cripple a property permanently, leaving ash and debris from the fire that can taint the produce and soil and render huge plots of land unusable.

One business that is already predicted to suffer long-term from the fires are the wineries and vineyards; a huge part of the California land real estate market. While 90 percent of the grapes have already been harvested, farmers are worried about next year. The ash and debris from the wildfires could cause next year’s grapes to have an unpleasant smoky flavor at best, and could ruin the crops completely at worst.

If we want to take a closer look at what the future long-term effects of this natural disaster are, we first need to look back at past disasters and their impact.

In 2003, the Cedar Fire burned over 280,000 acres of land in San Diego. It caused over $1.3 billion in damages and resulted in 15 deaths. The already fire-prone climate of California (the Santa Ana winds make fire travel faster, while the dry, warm climate is prime for disaster) was made worse by an overstretched fire department and policies that prevented them from taking steps to end the fire sooner. This devastating loss took a long-term toll on land real estate sales (wildfires reduces both land and residential real estate by 10 percent, while a second fire knocks the prices down by nearly 23 percent) and the soil. Fire sucks necessary nutrients out of the soil. Bad soil can lead to withered crops, less wildlife returning to your property, and a plummeting value for the land.

However, some good did come out of the tragedy. Advancements in firefighting and new technology (including this 747 “SuperTanker” equipped with powerful firefighting equipment) were created to prevent future disasters like the Cedar Fire. New laws and policies were created to help firefighters to stop forest fires before they spread.

Other natural disasters can also be just as harmful to a land real estate agent’s business and for landowners alike. Like wildfires, floods can force sellers to lower their property’s prices due to decreased property values and drown crops, while hurricanes can cause timberland prices to plunge.

One example is Hurricane Andrew’s effects on Florida. The hurricane was so strong that scientists retired the name forever. In 1992, this category five hurricane tore through Florida, causing $25.3 billion in damages and 44 deaths. The storm ripped apart land real estate and changed the environment forever. Hurricane Irma, the 2017 hurricane that resulted in at least 134 deaths, caused over $66.77 billion in damages. These numbers could have been much higher if Floridians hadn’t used what they learned from Hurricane Andrew to prepare for the storm. Emergency crews were trained in dealing with massive storms, residents installed hurricane shutters and other protective gear on their property, and tolls were suspended to promote evacuations. While the damage and death toll left in the wake of the storm was still horrific, people used what they’d learned from the last disaster to keep their loved ones and property safe.

Again, we see laws put in place to prevent future damage. A new law required supermarkets, gas stations, and hospitals to have generators on hand so that they could open faster in a storm. Emergency management became faster and more efficient. Florida became the example for the rest of America in how to prepare your land real estate and your home for a natural disaster. Here are a few tips you can take from previous natural disasters:

-Be aware of potential disasters. No one can predict all natural disasters, but there are some that are more likely than others. For example, California is a hotbed for wildfires (dry, warm climate + the powerful Santa Ana winds = trouble) and earthquakes. Property near mountainous regions are prone to landslides. Middle America is most likely to get hit by a tornado. Stay aware of what you and your land property are most likely to be hit by so you can be prepared.

-Have an emergency kit. If you or your property is in an area of land that is high risk for a natural disaster, be sure to have the necessities ready. FEMA (the Federal Emergency Management Agency) has an emergency list they recommend (check it out here). The most important things to remember are a three-day’s supply of clean water, non-perishable foods (granola bars, dried fruit, canned vegetables), a flashlight, and copies of important documents like your will and passport that could get destroyed in a natural disaster.

So, what can be expected after the smoke clears and the waters recede? What are the long-term effects from these disasters? There are two things we know about how California will do after the fires, one good and one bad. The bad news is that the long-term effects on the land and environment can be serious and long lasting. The effect of ash in the soil and water can be devastating for the land, and the prices of land real estate will most likely be impacted for years to come.

However, the good news is that the lessons learned from this wildfire will help prepare people to protect their properties before the next disaster strikes. After each disaster, new laws, regulations, and technology are developed to fix the problems that caused the natural disaster. Even though the short and long-term effects of the wildfire are disheartening, each disaster offers a chance to learn something new and get even closer to learning how to control natural disasters.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Surprising The Land Lover In Your Life

Some people will love any gift you give them: others are a bit pickier. Then there are those people you will have absolutely no idea for what to get them. Below, we’ve found great gifts for the land lover in your life that is impossible to shop for (or even to treat yourself).

That One Person You Don’t Know in Secret Santa

There’s always that one person in Secret Santa who no one knows that well. And this year, you picked their name. Luckily you do know that they love land and everything related to it. So what do you get someone who you know almost nothing about other than that?

1. Travel Pro Power Bank. This compact phone charger is a thoughtful gift for a wide variety of personalities. You can charge your phone from 0% to 100% quickly, which is great for people who love long hiking trips, car rides, or people who just forgot to plug their phone in overnight.

2. Kelvin.23. Everyone can find a use for this tool. The Kelvin 23 is twenty-three tools in one. It includes a hammer, a six-foot tape measure, sixteen screw and socket bits, and more.

3. Batch Gift Box. Who wouldn’t love to open a box of Southern goodies? Choose from dozens of baskets based on food (coffee, barbeque, chocolate) or state/city (Austin, Nashville, Louisiana). If you know where your Secret Santa is from or what type of food your Secret Santa likes to snack on, you can get the perfect Christmas gift.

 

The Hard-To-Impress Hostess

She is the perfect hostess and gift giver, and now you want to return the favor. Even though her manners are perfect, maybe you’re a little bit intimidated by her. It feels like no matter what you get her, she won’t be impressed.

1. Beautiful copies of classic books. A beautiful copy of a classic book is sure to impress. Bonus points if you know her favorite author.

2. Good Grips Cold Brew Coffee Maker. This coffee maker makes brewing after-dinner coffee easier. It brews tea, too!

3. Maggie Louise Chocolates. The All Is Bright Chocolate Box features jewel-colored chocolates in the shape of ornaments. They come in an assortment of white, dark, and milk chocolate. Who doesn’t love a little chocolate to sweeten up their holiday season?

 

The Guy Who Already Has Everything

The latest in technology, food, clothes – he has it. He’s always on top of the trends and has everything his heart desires. What do you get the man who already has everything?

1. Southern Bourbon Stout Beer Brewing Kit. Is he the type of guy who loves beer and is always on the hunt for a new favorite? Now he can make his own!

2. Dakine Party Bucket. This is perfect for barbeques or outdoor parties. The Dakine Party Bucket contains one insulated wine bottle bolter and eight built-in insulated Koozies for the drink of his choice. There’s also a built-in bottle opener and water-resistant snack pocket.

3. Monogrammed Leather Cocktail Shaker. Even the guy who seems to have everything doesn’t have a customized cocktail shaker.

 

In Laws

Stressing out about gifts for the in-laws is a holiday tradition. Would a gag gift be greeted with laughs or death stares? Here are some gifts that’ll please the parents.

1. Custom House Portrait Art. This unique artwork is a thoughtful gift. You can make a custom line drawing in the color of your choice of a place that is special to them, like the church they got married in or the family house. This is a gift that you know won’t end up gathering dust in the garage.

2. Custom Large Casserole Lasagna Pan. This will definitely get you in your in-laws’ good graces. You can customize this lasagna pan with a family recipe.

3. Homemade Pecan Pie. Want to make something a little more hands-on? Try a homemade pie. Here’s a recipe that only requires seven ingredients and has rave reviews. Gifts always mean more when the secret ingredient is love.

 

Your Teenage Niece

You want to get her something trendy, but the trends change so fast that by the time you get a gift, there’s a good chance that it’s no longer cool. Here are some gift ideas that’ll never go out of style.

1. Monogram Something Unique. She probably already has a monogramed necklace and sweatshirt, so why not think outside the box? You can monogram soaps , umbrellas, Christmas ornaments, stickers, beach towels, and more. Looking for more options? Sites like Etsy have an unlimited number of customizable gifts.

2. Home State Necklace. This is a simple piece that goes with everything and can remind them of home even if they are away for the holidays.

3. Lilly Pulitzer iPhone case. She’ll love this gorgeous watercolor case that adds a little personality to an otherwise standard item.

We hope these gift ideas help you kick-start your holiday shopping and give you inspiration for the perfect gift for even the most difficult people on your Christmas list. Happy Holidays!

How To Make More Money Off Of Your Christmas Tree Farm

It’s that time of year again. With Thanksgiving now behind us, people are in the holiday spirit, which means it is peak Christmas tree season.

However, Christmas trees come with a unique set of complications. It’s a crop that’s only sold once a year, the trees take a lot of money and effort to transport, and use up a ton of land. Christmas trees have one of the smallest time frames for buying and selling of any crop, even though they can take up to eight years to reach maturity.

Despite all of that, Christmas trees are still a lucrative crop and bring in steady holiday money to big and small farms alike. If you’re interested in learning how to make more money off of your Christmas tree land, read on.

  1. Make Low-Cost Adjustments to Get Better Trees

Just like how people will pay more for beautiful flowers or huge, juicy strawberries, you can make more money off of good-looking trees. There are some tricks you can use in the early stages of the tree’s life to increase its value. If you make adjustments in the soil that your trees are growing in to get the right PH balance and moisture level, your trees will be much heathier and better looking. Also, keep up the habit of shaping your Christmas trees. Cutting away at dead and gnarled branches every year helps to give the trees that beautiful conical shape that everyone loves. It might seem tedious, but the results will be worth it.

  1. Grow the Most Popular Types of Trees

Some varieties of Christmas trees sell better than others. The Fraser Fir is the most popular type of Christmas tree because of its wonderful scent and classic Christmas tree look. But some places prefer different types of trees. The Eastern Red Cedar is popular in the South because its natural cone-like shape doesn’t require much maintenance. The White Fir is popular in California for its needle retention. Look up the sales for your region in the last year and invest in the type of tree that is selling best to maximize your profit potential.

  1. Consider Pick Your Own/Cut Your Own

Pick-Your-Own sections have their pros and cons. On the pros side, it’s a great draw for a fun family day out, you can charge more for Pick-Your-Own trees than for regular trees, and people will stay on your property longer, which means they have more time to purchase your produce. However, having people linger on your property can also be a downside. People can wear down your land and cause damage to your crops. If your land is used to lots of visitors, then Pick-Your-Own could be an option for you. If not, consider having your Pick-Your-Own section far enough away from the rest of your crops so that customers don’t damage them. If it’s too late in the season to re-locate your Pick-Your-Own section, invest in plenty of fences and signs to keep people from wandering where they shouldn’t.

  1. Advertise, Advertise, Advertise!

If you haven’t started advertising yet, you should start as soon as possible. Most people buy their Christmas tree shortly after Thanksgiving, so you want to get the word out about your trees soon. And with people shopping for Thanksgiving and getting a head-start on their Christmas shopping, this is the perfect time to invest in a billboard ad. Since there is a time frame around how long you can sell trees and how long people will want to buy them, you’ll want to use this time to get the word out to as many people in your area as possible. Get creative! Use flyers, radio ads, newspaper ads, whatever you can think of.

  1. Don’t Cut Down All Your Trees at Once

Even though they are famous for their ability to withstand droughts, Christmas trees dry out after being cut down faster than you’d think. The trees start to lose moisture as soon as they are chopped down. Dehydrated or dying Christmas trees lose their needles and turn brown, which can turn potential buyers away from your property. So, instead of having lots of pre-cut trees out for display, only have a few trees on display and replace them as they are bought. A great way of keeping track of when to cut down trees is by taking pre-orders. This way, you can cut down the tree the day the buyer gets there instead of leaving it out to dry.

  1. Market What Makes Your Trees Unique

What makes your tree lot stand out from everyone else’s? Are your trees organic? A popular or unique type of pine tree? Is it a family-run ranch? Pick-Your-Own? Each of these is a great selling point for your advertisements. Also, if your trees have been grown with specific traits (needle retention, doesn’t need much upkeep, beautiful smell, extra-large, etc.), be sure to mention those, too.

  1. Give Your Trees the Spotlight on Social Media

Does your farmland have a website, blog, Facebook page, or Instagram? Put up some pictures of your best Christmas trees. This is an easy, free way to show off your produce. You can also put up pictures of the trees growing and the harvesting process so that potential buyers can get an insight into how the trees are taken care of (for more about immersive online farm tours, check out this article). If you’re looking for inspiration, check out websites like Texas Christmas Tree Farms and Peltzer Pines Christmas Tree Farm.

  1. Have Other Goodies Out to Buy

When people come to your farm, it’s the perfect time to show off your produce. You can sell home baked goodies (gingerbread is a holiday favorite!), hot chocolate or cider, winter crops, holly, and mistletoe. But why stop at produce? People love to buy unique gifts for their loved ones during the holidays, so consider selling things like homemade jewelry, baked goods, wood carvings, and more next to your Christmas .

Christmas trees can be a tricky crop, but with plenty of preparation and a marketing plan, you can make more money off of your Christmas tree farm.

Top Land Real Estate Blogs to Follow in 2018

Following land real estate blogs is one of the easiest ways to keep your land and business ahead of the game. The only hard part? Finding blogs with credible sources, useful information, and content that’s up-to-date with the latest real estate news. To help you get the best information for your land, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite land real estate blogs (we left out the RLI blog, since you’re already lucky enough to know about it if you’re reading this post!). In no particular order, here are our top land real estate blogs to follow in 2018:

1. Whitetail Properties blog, The Hunting Blog

Whitetail blog

 

 

This is the go-to blog for anything to do with hunting properties. Need advice about buying or selling hunting land? They’ve got that. Want to learn about the best spots to harvest big game? They’ve got that, too. If you own a hunting property or just love hunting, you have to be following this blog!

2. National Land Realty blog

National Land Realty blog

 

The clean layout of the National Land Realty blog makes it easy to find the articles you want. You can choose from categories like Investing, Ownership, Cabin & Home, and Hunting & Fishing. Our favorite category? Industry News, which will keep you updated on the latest technology and news you need to know. Many of the posts are from their agents, ensuring the authors have hands-on experience in the field.

3. LandThink blog

Land Think Blog

 

Want to make more money with your property? Then this blog is for you. These no-nonsense articles let you know exactly what steps you need to take to get the most out of your property. The “A Land Buyer’s Checklist” series lays out exactly what you need in order to increase a property’s value.

4. Land.com blog

Land.com

 

What’s great about this blog is the wide variety of topics they cover. While the Buying Land and Selling Land sections seem pretty straightforward, the articles in the other sections cover every topic under the sun, ranging from quail sustainability to prepping your home for a natural disaster to fly-fishing. Written by land real estate and ranch experts, you know you’re getting the best information.

5. Landhub.com

Land Hub Blog

 

This blog takes a look at the long-term effects of owning land real estate with articles like “Could Buying Land Be An Investment In Your Child’s Future?” and “What Kind of Damage Can Terminates Do To A Home?”. Be sure to follow this blog if you’re in the real estate game for the long haul. This blog is also chock-full of how-to material for everything from thinning timber to how to sell to Millennials. While this blog’s layout is a little different than the other blogs on this list, it has great information if you are willing to dig around a bit

6. Land Blog… Get The Dirt!

Land Blog

 

 

Did you read our 2017 round up of blogs to watch? You might notice this blog was featured in there as well! This blog is great for people who don’t want to be bombarded with articles. It gives you monthly articles about the nuts and bolts of being successful in the world of real estate. Kent Morris is an ALC (Accredited Land Consultant), so you know you can trust his advice.

7. Harvest Returns blog

Harvest Returns blog

 

Interested in investing in agriculture, but not sure where to begin? This blog breaks down the basics for you and follows the trends of investments and returns. You’ll get a crash course in investing from following this blog and learn all sorts of useful information. For example, did you know that US Farmland investments have a higher annual return than gold? The articles about the latest land laws and regulations are also important to read. They cut through the political jargon to get to the heart of the matter; how the new laws are going to affect you.

 

 

rural house

Five Essential Tips to Maintaining a Rural Home

Living out in the country certainly isn’t for everyone. Some people are too accustomed to the city life, have a need to be near other people or desire a home with no maintenance. However, for the right type of person, there’s nothing better than a rural home.

There are plenty of benefits to living in a rural area. The one you’ll likely notice first is how quiet and peaceful it is without the constant noise that becomes a part of life in the city.

Of course, when you live in a rural home, it presents its own unique set of challenges. You need to handle more tasks yourself, and nature can rise up quickly if you don’t stay on top of it. With the following tips, you’ll be able to better maintain your rural home.

Invest in the Tools for the Job

There’s just no sense in trying to extinguish a fire with a water gun. You don’t want maintaining your land to be any more difficult than it has to be, which is why you should invest in tools that make the job easier. The right tools will depend in part on your home and the amount of land you have. If you’ve acquired quite a bit of land, a push mower or even a small riding mower just isn’t going to do the trick.

A good riding mower is important to keep the grass in check because it can get out of control quickly, especially after some rain. Planning on planting anything? You’ll need a soil tiller. A compact tractor is a good choice for its versatility, as you can use it to mow, dig, move snow and much more.

barn house

Build a Barn

This can be expensive, but look at it like this – you’re already going to invest money in equipment for your home. If you then leave that equipment uncovered, weather will cause all kinds of wear and tear, reducing its lifespan. You may be able to get away with using your garage depending on what equipment you have, but you’re likely going to need a barn at some point.

Besides, barns are cool. They can be a source of pride and a relaxing retreat if you’re the sort who enjoys some manual labor – and if you’re looking into country living, you’d better be. If you plan to have any animals on your land that won’t be living in your home, then you’ll need a barn for them as well anyways.

Establish a Fence Line

Even though you want to stay close to nature, you also need to make sure the land that’s yours is clearly identified. Fence lines can help you to corral animals, section off portions of land for a specific use, or identify property lines. Disputes over where your property ends and a neighbor’s begins can be frustrating. Avoid that headache entirely by establishing a fence line.

After you’ve got your fence up, walk along it occasionally to check for any issues. If posts are rotting, replace them. If they’re loose, reset them so that they fit snugly. Make sure the fence is snug and if it’s an electric fence, test the voltage at different areas.

 

Keep the Area Near Your Home Especially Well Maintained

Some wild animals can be a treat to watch. There’s nothing like spotting a family of deer or a herd of elk while you’re sipping your morning coffee. Other animals – pests, essentially – will see your home as the perfect place for their own safety. Rats and snakes can be dangerous and you definitely don’t want them setting up shop in your home.

One personality trait that many of these animals have in common is an aversion to crossing open fields. That’s precisely why they like the look of your home and surrounding shrubs; they look for places where they can easily hide. If you’re mowing the grass and trimming bushes regularly, it’s far less likely that you’ll have any pest problems. And when in doubt, you can call in your very own enforcer, leading into the next tip.
farm dog
Get a Dog

They’re called man’s best friend for a reason and dogs are perfect company in a rural area. They’ll be thrilled to have so much open space to run around and play. Besides being nice to have around, dogs can also help in many ways around a rural home. Many dogs have herding instincts to keep livestock in the proper area. Breeds that are especially good at this include the Australian cattle dog, the Australian shepherd, the border collie, and the Rottweiler, although there are also many others.

Predators and pests will think twice about coming near your home or your livestock when they smell or hear your dog. And of course, your dog would love the opportunity to alert you whenever someone stops by your home.

Living in a rural area can be an extremely rewarding experience for the right type of person. Despite all the tips you could read, some of the learning simply comes from experience of rolling up your sleeves and getting out there. However, if you invest in the right tools, identify and organize your property, and consider getting a dog, you’ll be on the right track and avoid many potential issues.

About the author: Selene Strong is a contributing writer and media specialist for Bradley Mowers. She regularly produces content for a variety of landscaping and gardening blogs.

Kudzu: Friend or Foe?

Kudzu.  The mere mention of the word often invokes a visceral combination of both annoyance and fear.  Personally, I think of the movie ‘The Blob’ which was first released in 1958 starring Steve McQueen and Aneta Corseaut battling a gelatinous, alien life form that slowly engulfed everything in its path.  Similarly, I view kudzu as a scary, green pest slowly creeping along, plaguing the land in which it captures, and becoming the perfect habitat for an evil creature to live patiently waiting for its next unsuspecting victim to wander too close!  Am I being a bit dramatic?  Possibly. However, I’ve yet to meet anything other than a rattlesnake that considers kudzu a friend.

I was recently showing a beautiful tract of land to a client.  Everything was going well until we rounded a corner and there it was – a gigantic kudzu patch that looked like it had been growing for decades.  Rightfully so, the client expressed concern with having this on the property.  He wondered if kudzu could be eradicated and if so, would it be in his best interest to do so from both a financial and land preservation perspective.  These great questions left me eager to learn more about this common yet mysterious annoyance that I had become somewhat complacent towards having grown up in the South. Where did it come from originally?  Did it have a purpose?  If destroyed, does it do more harm than good?  I’d always considered kudzu a foe…but could it be a friend?

Cultures in the Pacific Rim utilize the kudzu root in cooking, teas, and herbal remedies.  The history of kudzu in the United States began in 1876, where it was brought to the World’s Fair in Philadelphia from Japan with the purpose of controlling soil erosion.  Seven years later, the Deep South embraced it as a beautiful ornamental plant that provided excellent shade for porches during the sweltering summer months!  Mesmerized by the immediate benefits of this hearty plant many of our ancestors used it for livestock feed, fertilizer, honey, and even a potential source for bio-fuel.  The government embraced the kudzu “bandwagon” and paid folks to plant it.  By 1946, they estimated over 3 million acres had been planted throughout the country.  They soon realized that this “dream plant” was turning out to be a nightmare rapidly spreading up to a foot a day especially in the Southeastern states due to its drought- thriving indigenous nature.  It climbed up trees, shrubs, and anything in its path… like “The Blob” …blocking sun rays thus diminishing or eliminating all of the photosynthetic productivity of the plush greenery underneath. Any soil erosion it may have prevented was ultimately a moot point considering its path of natural plant destruction.

In 1953, the U.S. Department of Agriculture removed kudzu from their list of suggested cover plants.  It was not until 1997, however, that it made the Federal noxious weed list.  To date, it is believed that kudzu now covers close to 7.5 million acres in Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida alone! In addition to being a nuisance, kudzu has a significantly negative economic impact throughout the United States.  It is estimated that power companies spend between $1,500,000 – $1,700,000 annually to repair power line damage caused by kudzu.  The U.S. Forest Service reports have a much more conservative estimate of approximately 227,000 acres of kudzu growing in our forests. Some estimates are that close to $300,000,000 of lost forest productivity occurs annually due to kudzu infestation.

So, what did I tell my client?  Not to automatically dismiss a property because of kudzu, however, be sure to estimate the cost and time involved with controlling it.  County extension offices are typically equipped to assist landowners in determining the best plan of action based on their specific needs and location. Here are some of the most commonly used techniques for controlling kudzu on private land:

  • Mechanically:  mowing or cutting the vine back to slightly above ground level.  Kudzu debris should be completely removed then burned to prevent regrowth.  Another mechanical method involves completely removing the root crown by using a shovel to expose the base and then an axe to sever the root just below the crown.
  • Chemically: applying herbicides once at the beginning of the growing season (May) and then again in late summer or early fall. To completely kill the plant, plan on spraying 40-80 gallons an acre bi annually for a few years.  Tordon and Triclopyr are common herbicides used to eradicate kudzu.
  • Naturally: enlisting the help of animals to graze the kudzu.  Many use a small herd of goats or sheep to help in the battle.

Kudzu. It just goes to show you that something that started way back in 1876 as a clever idea to control soil erosion turned out to be a foe at best, “The Blob” at worst, and most definitely not a friend.

About the Author: Eric Leisy, ALC, is an avid outdoors-man, freelance outdoor writer, REALTOR® & Land Specialist for Great Southern Land Co.

sage grouse

Sage Grouse Management in the News

I read the recent article noting that our new Secretary of the Interior was directing mangers of the public lands to include flexibility in their plans to improve on sage grouse habitats. This, and in other articles I have read, continue to reference “livestock grazing” as one of the reasons for the decline of the sage grouse. In one article, they cite the main reasons for the decline of the sage grouse: “In 2013, the FWS identified 14 threats to the greater sage grouse: nonnative invasive plants, energy development, sagebrush removal, improper grazing, range management structures, wild horses and burros, pinyon-juniper expansion, agricultural conversion, mining, recreation, urbanization, infrastructure and fences.”   Interestingly enough, they always leave out the one reason that probably has the most impact on sage grouse populations and that is “Predators.”

We have more predators of the sage grouse now than ever before and still most will not recognize them as a major factor. One predator in particular whose population has grown by a thousand percent is the raven. University studies since 1948 have shown ravens as major predators of ground nesting birds and a 2003-2005 study “The Effects of Raven Removal on Sage Grouse Nest Success” by Peter S. Coates and David J. Delehanty of Idaho State University confirms the benefits of taking Raven’s out of the picture for improved nest success.

sage grouseWhy not give credit where credit is due? Some believe it is because controlling predators won’t give the public lands managers the control on other resource users that using “critical habitat” does.  There are organizations in the West whose main goals are to interfere with livestock grazing on public lands. In Idaho, they are trying to have dirt tanks (ponds created to store water for livestock) filled in because they are used as breeding grounds by mosquitoes since they are carriers for the West Nile disease which is found to also kill sage grouse.  Any of us who spend a lot of time in the habitat will tell you that these same ponds are frequented by many species of wildlife that benefit from them, just a livestock do.

Many argue that there has been entirely too much time and money spent on improving “habitat” for sage grouse. Historical records indicate there were very few sage grouse in the Great Basin before man settled. The journals of early day settlers such as Peter Skeen Ogdon (1828-1829); Jedediah Smith (1827); John Charles Fremont (1843-45) pay a lot of attention to wildlife and the diets of the native American’s they encountered.  In all these journals, there was one record of sage grouse found as a diet item (RE: testimony of Nevada Assemblyman Ira Hansen 2011). In the meetings in 2012, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWL) was conducting a hearing on the potential listing of the sage grouse, they noted that they were using as a starting point the mid 1800’s and the areas they identified as sage brush areas at that time.  They were also using a two-million bird prediction based off that number of acres of sage brush.  In other words, the number of Sage Grouse being managed for is based on poor data that is not substantiated by historical records.

Livestock grazing can actually be a benefit to sage grouse and, if you look at the records, you will see that at the same time we had the most livestock on public lands is when we had the largest sage grouse populations. I believe mainly for two reasons:  first, we had an active predator control program at that same time; and second, over grazing of grass species allows shrubs to encroach onto those areas being overgrazed.

Livestock grazing kept the excess fuels down and we had fewer range fires. Managing for grass required leaving excess grass to reseed and I can tell you we have a lot more grass now than when I was a kid in the 1950’s and 60’s. In those days, we didn’t have government fire centers that did the firefighting, we did it ourselves. All the ranchers and other county residents would drop what they were doing when a fire started to put it out. That meant bull dozers being loaded and put on fire lines, it meant filling barrels with water, grabbing soaked seed sacks to slap out flames, and not stopping even at dark.  In fact, we usually got the fire under control at night as the winds calmed down and the moisture content of the air went up. We don’t have forests to deal with so fighting fires at night isn’t much danger.  Unfortunately, even today, the agencies who now control firefighting shut it down at dark and wait until after their 7 am fire meeting is over the next morning to get back to it. Changing this one policy would keep the size of our fires down considerably. To their credit, however, this year they are getting on the fires much sooner that they have in the past.

In summary and in my opinion  a)the sage grouse are not at a low enough population level to justify being listed as threatened or endangered;  b) the Critical Habitat Provision of the Endangered Species Act is being abused to list species whose populations don’t warrant listing; c) Livestock grazing is not a negative to the sage grouse; d)Predators are not even sited as one of the main impacts on the population even though there are numerous studies that show they are a large factor; e)the agency’s policy of not fighting fires in the Great Basin at night has burned literally hundreds of thousands of acres unnecessarily. On the other hand, I just sold a 10,000 acre ranch I had listed for over eight years to be used for sage grouse meditation with federal agencies. Suave on the sore!

About the author: Paul Bottari, ALC, is Owner/Broker for Bottari & Associates Realty Inc. in Wells, NV. Paul serves on the REALTORS® Land Institute 2017 Government Affairs Committee.