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prospecting phone calls

Prospecting Scripts For Land Professionals

Not all REALTORS® love cold calling, but most of those that are successful in the business have learned to do so effectively while making it an integral part of their daily prospecting. Dedicating a portion of your day to cold calling will ensure that you stay sharp on market trends and connected with the owners in your region. There is no better way to keep a pulse on landowner perspectives than by talking with landowners on a regular basis.

A few things to remember before picking up the phone:

  • Plan what you want from the call. Is your goal to get a meeting and/or listing, submit an unsolicited offer, confirm contact info, etc.?
  • Empathize, put yourself in their shoes. What type of land are you calling on and what type of owner are they? What is important to them? You will have a higher success rate if you are able to speak to a landowner about activity in the market and/or topics that are relevant to them.
  • Preparation will lead to confidence. Know the market and data – but, don’t be afraid to tell an owner you don’t know something in response to a question. It is better to let them know you will research it and get back to them, than to guess and get it wrong. This will help to establish trust with the owner while simultaneously giving you a reason to follow up.
  • Enthusiasm is contagious. Nobody wants to have a depressing conversation. You should be excited about what you do. But also, try to mirror the pace and tone of the person you are speaking with. This doesn’t mean copying them, but rather speaking to them how they are speaking to you.
  • Personalize your approach. We are better when we are being ourselves. This could mean adjusting any cold calling script to play to your individual strengths.

prospecting phone and note pad

Below is an example cold call prospecting script for land professionals along with a few variations depending on the nature of the conversation.

Introduction

Good evening/afternoon, this is (name) with (company/firm). May I speak with (owner’s name), the owner of the (land asset) located in (name of city/area)?

The reason for my call is:

Approach 1 (We have buyers)

We have been active in the market and are in contact with several motivated buyers looking for property similar to yours. Would you be interested in considering an offer if one of these prospects would like to submit on your property?

(Wait for response)

  • If they are receptive – Great, it would be helpful to meet and discuss your goals in more detail so that we are able to guide the prospects toward a deal structure that best achieves your desired outcome. What is your availability in the next few days?
  • If they are moderately receptive – I understand this is a big decision and you haven’t had the chance to think about it. At a minimum, could we schedule a quick meeting in the next few days to discuss the market and any specific goals that you have regarding your property?
  • If they are not interested – I appreciate the consideration. Would you like to be kept apprised of market data and see similar properties that we are bringing to market? Is there a reasonable time frame for me to follow up and see if things have changed, perhaps 12 months?

Closing – Going forward, is this the best number to reach you? Would you prefer email? Thank you for your time and I look forward to speaking with you again.

Approach 2 (Recent sale)

We recently sold (name or location of property you recently sold) at a price of (price/acre or another applicable unit) which represented a record value in the market (Alternative – Or use another data point – like the number of offers, quickness of the process, etc. – that may be a motivating factor for another owner) and was shown substantial buyer interest.

Have you considered listing your property to take advantage of the current demand and strong values?

(wait for response)

  • If they are receptive – Great, it would be helpful to meet and discuss your goals, as well as tour the property so that we may provide you with our estimate of value. What is your availability in the next few days?
  • If they are moderately receptive – I understand this is a big decision and you haven’t had the chance to think about it. At a minimum, could we schedule a quick meeting in the next few days to discuss the market and any specific goals that you have regarding your property?
  • If they are not interested – I appreciate the consideration. Would you like to be kept apprised of market data and see similar properties that we are bringing to market? Is there a reasonable time frame for me to follow up and see if things have changed, perhaps 12 months?

Closing – Going forward, is this the best number to reach you? Would you prefer email? Thank you for your time and I look forward to speaking with you again.

Approach 3 (General)

We are active in (your region, specific location of the land, specific land type, etc.) and are reaching out to owners to learn about their goals and so we are able to speak generally about each asset in the market. Do you have a few moments to discuss your property or is there a better time to speak?

(wait for response)

  • If they are receptive(Start asking questions.) Given how strong the values are at this time, have you considered selling? Would it be helpful to your estate planning if we were to provide a broker’s price opinion? Have you considered purchasing more land to increase the scale of your operation? How is everything going with your operation? Would you like us to send you information about activity to keep you informed about market trends? (have several potential questions to ask based on the type of property, specific market trends, and type of ownership).
  • If they are moderately receptive(get to the point) I understand you are busy. I wanted to quickly understand if you have considering selling, buying or are simply holding at this time…. Any information we could provide or questions about the market we could answer to assist you with your planning?
  • If they are not interested(ask to follow up with questions via email. If they don’t want to talk and won’t give you their email, MOVE ON.)

Closing  Going forward, is this the best number to reach you? Would you prefer email? Thank you for your time and I look forward to speaking with you again.

Through the practice of cold calling, you will become more comfortable and capable at gauging the conversation and guiding it in the direction you would like it to go. The bottom line is to pick up the phone and remember, an imperfect cold call is far better than no cold call. Happy calling!

Matt DavisAbout the author: Matt Davis is a real estate broker with Cushman & Wakefield. He is based in San Diego, CA, and assists clients with the disposition and acquisition of investment grade agricultural and transitional land assets. He is also founding member of the company’s Land Advisory Group and Agribusiness Solutions Team. Matt is a member of RLI and has served on their Future Leaders Committee.

Call The Neighbors And Other Prospecting Tips

Early in my land career, I learned a valuable lesson. I got a call one day from a broker who works in my market area saying he had a prospect for one of my listings. They toured the property, submitted an offer, and we negotiated to an executed contract. About a week later I was gathering some information for the closing attorney via the property assessor website. It was then that I discovered that the buyer was the landowner immediately adjacent to my listing. The broker that submitted the offer had seen the property marketed online and was friends with the eventual buyer. He made one phone call to his friend and became the buyer’s broker in the deal. By failing to contact that individual myself, I gave up half of my commission – over $100,000.

Before I go on, I want to make it clear that I have no issues cooperating with other brokers. Our land broker community is a small one and pretty tight. I have done plenty of deals that would not have happened without the cooperation of fellow brokers and I welcome their involvement. But in the case above, this buyer was someone I could easily have gone to directly.

It seems like a simple thing – get in touch with the adjacent landowners to gauge their interest in your listing. But I screwed it up. So, maybe by pointing it out, I can help someone out there avoid the same mistake. Certainly, we all have go-to buyers who we contact the moment we have a property that fits in their wheelhouse. But it’s always possible the simplest solution is literally right next door.

Since entering the land brokerage industry 5 years ago, I’ve made a few (a lot of?) other mistakes or simply failed to do some (MANY!) important things. So, I’d like to offer some tips on prospecting to help you get more deals and maintain a more consistent pipeline.

When on the phone, if they will keep talking, let them talk!

When I first started cold calling, many of my calls lasted less than 20 seconds. I would get someone on the phone and ask if they wanted to sell. If they said “no”, conversation over. Move on to the next call. Over time, I realized I was doing it wrong. I began engaging people in conversation – even if I knew they weren’t sellers. I learned about people. I built relationships. And pretty frequently, I got a tip on a family member or friend nearby who owned land as well. By making the phone call less about a “yes” or “no” and more about gathering information, I was able to make my calls more productive and, frankly, more enjoyable. It was also a great way to set myself up for doing what I recommend in the next tip.

When prospects tell you “no”, call them back later

At this very moment, I am working on a rather large deal that is the result of consistently calling back a “no”. I’ve been following up with this guy for over 3 years and he is finally ready to sell. In fact, on my most recent follow up with him, he told me he still wasn’t a seller. Then he contacted me a week later and wanted to move forward. The point here is that people change. Regular follow up is VITAL to make sure you get to them when they are ready. Many things can make a landowner change their mind: a bad crop year, a death in the family, birth of grandkids, or whatever. The answer may be “no” today, but is likely to change to a “yes” at some point in the future. You want to make sure that when “yes” arrives, you are the only person that owner will think of.

Flag down the tractor

This tip falls a bit more under the heading of canvassing than prospecting. But when done well, it leads to more effective prospecting. Have you ever been out looking at land (in my case row crop farms) and seen someone plowing or spreading fertilizer? Next time you do, park your truck on the side of the road and see if you can get his attention. He might be a contractor, or a farmhand, or maybe even the owner himself. But no matter what his role or position, you’re bound to get some great information from him if you simply engage him in conversation. Using this technique, I’ve gotten names, addresses, and even cell phone numbers of quality prospects. It may sound a bit weird or make you uncomfortable, but the tractor driver generally welcomes the company. He likely spends most of his day alone in that tractor cab. Give him the opportunity to talk, ask the right questions, and before you know it you’ll be listing that $10MM property that you got from the guy on the tractor.

There are millions of different tips and tricks to effective prospecting. I’ve written in the past on outsourcing your time and using good software to boost your prospecting efforts. But there is no substitute for getting on the phone or talking in person with people who own property. In my opinion, this is far and away the most directly effective method for listing and selling property. First, call the neighbors. Then, call EVERYBODY ELSE.

This post is part of the 2018 Future Leaders Committee content generation initiative. The initiative is directed at further establishing RLI as “The Voice of Land” in the land real estate industry for land professionals and landowners. For more posts like this, click here.

mcdow, calebAbout the author: Caleb McDow, ALC, is a land specialist and vice president with Crosby & Associates, Inc. in Winter Haven, FL, with a Master of Science in Real Estate (MSRE) and is a licensed private pilot and drone operator. McDow joined the institute in 2014 as a Military Transition Program (MTP) member.  He serves on the Institute’s Future Leaders Committee and regularly blogs on real estate issues. Caleb McDow can be reached at 352-665-6648 or caleb@crosbydirt.com