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purchasing hunting land

Buyer Beware: Five Myths About Purchasing Hunting Land

When it comes to recreational land, one hunt precedes the other. When it comes to having your own hunting land, you’ll first want to seek out the best land for sale. Before you know it, you’ll hunt with the freedom that purchasing and owning your own hunting land affords.

Identify What’s Most Important

Rarely is there a single goal when you decide to buy land. What exactly do you hope to do with your recreational land? Is it for hunting, fishing, camping, ATV-ing or all the above? Is the land an investment? Do you hope to lease the land for farming? Are mineral rights a consideration? If so, who owns them? The highest and best use of the land for sale impacts price, often dramatically.

There are many ways to evaluate hunting land, beginning with road appeal. Homes have curb appeal, while land has road appeal. For example, is the land well maintained? How easy is it to get to? There’s always a balance to strike between travel time and hunting time.

When considering purchasing a hunting land parcel, inquire about trail camera footage, if available. The current owner may have years of footage revealing important information about the quantity and quality of the wildlife on the property. Once you make your purchase, install your own trail cameras without delay.

Attracting Game

You also want to ask yourself, “What is the realistic potential for attracting game to the land?” Check out water sources. If they are inadequate, consider what it will take to excavate a pond or add water troughs along deer trails. Are current or potential food sources available to attract the prey you seek? For example, deer love everything from clover to wheat, and from chestnuts to apples. Like wild boar, they love acorns too.

Finally, if you plan to add crops, trees or other food sources, make sure the soil type is appropriate. For example, heavy clay soils and chestnut trees do not mix.

Return on Investment

Getting revenue from hunting fees is great when it’s workable. However, there are other sources of revenue like harvesting timber and leasing for agriculture. Of course, there are intangible benefits as well. you may want to use your recreational land to entertain guests. Or, perhaps you’ll make it a place where you teach your children about hunting. Certainly, your return on investment may be about far more than money.

Building Generational Wealth

Over the generations, remote parcels may become land that’s ripe for development. Additionally, land has a tendency to increase in value over the long-term, even sometimes better than the stock market. It an be a comfort knowing that, one day, your grandchildren and great-grandchildren will enjoy the benefits of your foresight.

purchasing hunting land

Five Myths to Dispel About Hunting Land

Prospective land buyers purchasing hunting land will want to see through common myths that many first-time buyers fall prey to during the process. A diligent, fact-based approach with the assistance of a qualified land expert is always best.

Myth #1 – It’s just about buying an attractive piece of land

This is a little like shopping for cars based on color alone. It’s limiting. Okay, so the land is attractive to you. But is it attractive to the animals you hope to hunt and the food sources those animals need to thrive? Sources of food and water are key. So is the sense of security animals get from having adequate cover. Location is another key factor so make sure to consider who your neighbors are and seek information regarding any pending or potential future development projects nearby that may affect your property.

Myth #2 – Disregard open land for hunting

How committed are you to making the land more amenable to hunting in the long term? If you are willing to add features to attract wildlife, you might get more value by purchasing less desirable (and lower cost) land upfront. Then, you can improve the property to give deer cover from predators where none exists by planting low-growing shrubs and tall grasses and doing things like adding water, food plots, and licks where appropriate.

Myth #3 – Land values only go up

If you want to see your hunting land as an asset, check the potential for appreciation. Over time, demand may increase or decrease. Understand that while usually the value of the land will increase over the long-term, there is always the possibility that the land’s value does not increase. Fortunately, there are ways you can tilt things in your favor like making improvements to the property and investing in land that already has known potential for appreciation.

The most important thing you can do to ensure the property your are purchasing is a good investment is to Find A Land Consultant who is a qualified expert in your market. Owning, using, and building the value of your land can bring more pleasure than monitoring an increase in the value of stocks or a 401k.

Myth #4 – It’s simple to buy the right land

Buying a hunting property requires due diligence. For example, an awareness of possible zoning restrictions is critical. You also need a thorough knowledge of the prey you seek. Look for land with the features needed for successful hunting. Chat with nearby landowners about wildlife management. Are they fellow hunters concerned about how the harvest proceeds, or not?

Myth #5 – It’s tedious buying land

You don’t need to be an expert right out of the gate. A land real estate specialist can help fill in any knowledge gaps as your hunt for the perfect property when purchasing hunting land. It is crucial to find a trustworthy land specialist with a thorough understanding of the land market in your area. If you are purchasing hunting land, be sure to seek the advice and guidance of a land expert. Qualified land professionals in your area can be found using the REALTORS Land Institute’s Find A Land Consultant search tool.

With the right attitude and approach, the search for land can be downright fun. Appreciate the quest for finding the right piece of land for what it is – a journey to be enjoyed. During your search, stay focused on the pleasures that owning the right land will ultimately deliver. Envision the camaraderie and the invigorating days to come. Happy hunting!

hiking recreational land

Need To Knows For Buying Recreational Land Right Now

America is a land of wide-open spaces and with all its natural wonders how can you ever decide where to buy? What do you need to take into consideration?

My first consideration is made when considering the recreational opportunities desired. it sounds basic but you’d be surprised how easy it is to forget at the start that you need to have an end in mind. For example, for whitewater rafting you have got to have a river or if trophy whitetails make you heart race, let’s talk about deer habitat. You can’t have hiking trails without land anymore than you will have trophy bass without water.

bass fishing recreational property

Now that you have a idea of what you want to do with your time lets talk about how you get there.

I would recommend you start your search by talking with a Accredited Land Consultant (ALC) – find a land consultant. These are men and women that have spent years in the land business, completed education to enhance their ability to handle land transactions, and are masters of all facets of land sales. Most are outdoors man who live the lifestyle as well, hunting, fishing, etc.

If you decide that you want a property that can be managed for trophy deer your ALC will help you determine if the property you are looking at has the qualities it will need. Perhaps you will need a private wildlife biologist, or maybe you’ll need a heavy equipment operator that can clear travel lanes or create a pond for year-round water.

If you are considering buying a parcel that is in a national forest, have you considered all the recreational opportunities that just outside your door? Most national forests allow hunting and fishing on their lands as well as ATV trails.

If you are a fly fisherman, there are thousands of miles of private land with trout streams running through them. Imagine what a legacy you will leave behind if three or more generations all grew up fishing the same stream at grandpa’s place.

This just a drop in the bucket of all the different exciting opportunities that exist beyond the sidewalks and streetlights. Happy hunting!

About the Author: Tim Hadley, ALC, is an agent with Keller Williams Realty in Gladstone, MO. He joined the REALTORS® Land Institute in 2017 and is currently a member of their Future Leaders Committee.

 

kasey mock

About the Author: Kasey Mock is the Director of KW LAND Division at Keller Williams Realty International. Mock is a member of the REALTORS® Land Institute now serving on their Future Leaders Committee. Make sure to check out his break out session diving further into this topic at the 2018 National Land Conference in Nashville, TN, in March.

How To Maximize Your Listing: Hunting Properties

The Highest and Best Use. All in this industry know the value of this term, but are we consistently applying it in an effort to truly maximize the features of your latest listing? In researching ranch and land property listings across the United States, it is evident that there may be value being left on the table. Sometimes this value can be significant, but agents may gloss over it as just another feature. I’m talking about hunting properties. I’ve come across numerous listings with some of the best access to hunting and/or might even qualify for landowner tags that in some areas are worth thousands of dollars; and the listing has nothing more than a bullet point that says Hunting. In order to maximize the value of highest and best use, let’s look at how we can better represent and convert hunting into positive dollar value.

The Outdoor Industry’s Effect on Land Value

The wildlife recreation industry is a $110+ billion industry and, of that, over $25 billion comes from hunting alone. In the West, agricultural land is rapidly being converted for recreational uses. According to the CCIM Institute, “demand for both improved and unimproved recreational property has contributed to rising rural land prices. An increased interest in outdoor recreational hobbies as diverse as hunting and bird-watching, a graying baby-boom generation that is more conscious of the investment potential in vacation and retirement properties, and low interest rates have come together in the past five years to create a niche market for recreational land.”

How Access to Hunting Affects Property Values

As the outdoor industry continues to grow and access to public lands continues to shrink, land with hunting access has become highly desirable. Hunting properties provide a buyer with the perfect mix of recreation and investment. Passive cash-flow opportunities include the leasing hunting rights, in addition to grazing and leasing land for farming. According to CCIM, in many cases, a hunting lease can bring in more than five times the revenue from cattle grazing. Simply stating hunting on your listing doesn’t sound like nearly enough to communicate the value that the land truly holds in its highest and best use case.

How To Better Market Your Hunting Property

As a broker, how can you leverage the indiscernible value of a property with hunting amenities? A good place to start is to create a section in your listing dedicated to the hunting amenities. You may be leaving money on the table and doing your client a disservice to just list “hunting” as a bullet point. If you are not a hunter or don’t know much about the area, this can be easier said than done. So how can you find out more information quickly and inexpensively? Start with your local Parks and Wildlife office, as the rangers can help orient and qualify your search metrics. Also, consider jumping online and research the area around your client’s property, to see what kind of access public land access is available.

Consider becoming knowledgeable in your states hunting laws to determine if that property qualifies for landowner tags. For example, in Illinois, 40 acres is the minimum required to obtain a Deer tag for shotgun season, whereas western states may require a contiguous quarter-section worth of acreage, or more, to qualify. There is significant value in this knowledge, and it is well worth the time spent researching the finer details. To recap: here is a list of some key items to research and market on your hunting land listing:

  • Hunting Access: What is the nearest public land access or is the property large enough to hunt on
  • Wildlife Population: What is the wildlife population in that area? Big game, small game, waterfowl, and/or upland bird hunting
  • Revenue Opportunities: Does this property qualify for landowner tags and how many? Are you able to turn the land into a hunting lease?

These are three key elements that can offer more value to a hunting property, and a good starting place for any agent. However, if you find a trusted local contact who is a hunter and that has the right tools and knowledge of the area, you can consider putting together a spectacular Hunting Guide that is sure to impress any prospective buyer. There are also a myriad of companies throughout the US with dedicated teams of hunters and outdoorsman, who can help in putting together a complete hunting and outdoor recreation analysis to be used to bring considerable value to the unseen benefits of a property. Consider reaching out to your local RLI chapter or use the Find A Land Consultant search tool provided by RLI for help in finding a consultant who can provide maps with public land access, hunting units, species migration patterns, hunting tag draw odds, landowner tag information, and more.

As land is being converted to recreation and access to public lands is shrinking, there is more value than ever before in hunting properties. The right buyer for a hunting property will know its inherent value, but don’t miss the target in marketing it appropriately, for achieving that highest and best use should be a guiding, as well as an inherent, principal.

Reference Citations

“Hunting for Recreational Properties”, CCIM Institute,

https://www.ccim.com/cire-magazine/articles/hunting-recreational-properties/?gmSsoPc=1

 

About the Author: Mike Miller, MBA, is the Vice President and Co-founder of White River Ranch Marketing LLC. With a background in Automotive and Sports and Entertainment Marketing, Mike is lending his decade-plus of experience in marketing and branding to the farm and ranch land real estate industry via his startup, WRRM – designed to expand the virtual impact of land brokers and their listings throughout the US.

Recreational Land 101

Recreational land is different than other land types. Its success isn’t measured in crops, but on the quality of the time spent on the land. Whether you buy recreational land as a hideaway for generations to enjoy or to create a lucrative hunting spot, recreational land does have some unique barriers to achieving success. Since this land type isn’t talked about as much as residential land or farmland, we wanted to dedicate a blog post to commonly asked questions about recreational land.

What is recreational land?

As the name suggests, recreational land is land that is used for recreation. The types of recreation can vary – hunting, fishing, camping, ATV-ing, and more. In the industry, hunting is one of the most popular and well-recognized uses for recreational land.

What should I look for when buying recreational land?

Knowing what zoning regulations and restrictions impact a property is one of the most important things to look for. These regulations can impact everything from build-ability to what you are allowed to hunt. Work with a land expert in your area who can help you find a property zoned right for your intended use.

If you want to use the land for hunting, keep an eye out for animals and things animals like. Food plots, a good source of water, and cover for animals to feel safe in is key for attracting game to your land.

Good neighbors can also make or break a recreational property. If the property is part of a managed neighborhood, that’s a great sign that they are dedicated to helping everyone in that community and their land to thrive. Bad neighbors (for example, poachers, people who make noises that scare animals or disturb the natural peace, or people that dump waste into the river) can ruin an otherwise perfect property.

What are the benefits of buying recreational land?

How you benefit from the land is up to you. You could let other people enjoy the property and its amenities for a fee. You could improve the land and sell it for a profit down the road.

You can also use it for your friends and family as a retreat from the rest of the world. If kept in good shape, recreational land can be something passed down for generations that will only increase in value.

How can I add value to my recreational land?

There are dozens of ways to add value to your recreational land. In his guest post for RLI, Bob Stalberger, ALC, suggests adding trail cameras as a cheap and effective way to add value.

“Buyers are always asking me to see trail camera photos from the property for sale,” said Stalberger. “When we check the analytics of our listings, it is proven that a listing with good trail camera photos vastly outperforms a listing without them. In addition, I personally advise my new buyers to go buy a thumb drive and save trail camera photos from day one, even if they have no plans of ever selling. It is great to be able to show a buyer 2-10 years of trail camera photos and allow them to see the quality and quantities of deer using the property.”

Tommy Stroud, Jr, ALC, recommends creating habitats for animals to thrive in. He says, in his guest post for the RLI Blog, about a recent property he helped to add value to “This [property] required thinning the trees back to 35-50 trees per acre. A skid steer with a grinder ate up a lot of the long-abandoned under story before Garlon (Triclopyr) was sprayed to prevent hardwood growth. These fields were burned using prescriptive fire in late February.  Continuing to burn every one or two years will keep this stand clean and provide a great habitat for all wildlife.”

Recreational land is so much more than just another land type. It can be a family heirloom passed down from generation to generation, a profitable business, or just a place to get away from the rest of the world. Interested in owning a piece of your recreational land? Make sure to Find A Land Consultant that has the expertise required to conduct these types of transactions. Interested in learning more about recreational land as an agent? Check out the Recreational Land Real Estate LANDU course.

About the Author: Laura Barker is a freelance writer based out of California for the REALTORS® Land Institute. She has been with RLI since October 2017.

Adding Recreational Value to your Property

The majority of the buyers in my market are typically looking for properties with two characteristics: timberland for an investment and hunting for recreation. However, there aren’t many properties that ideally fit both characteristics. Sometimes I scratch my head, wondering why there aren’t more people willing to play the role of a developer and convert timber tracts into recreational retreats for profit. While it’s rare for an established hunting retreat to hit the open market, the properties that do, usually justify their price premium and get purchased quickly.

Timber real estate investment trusts (REITs) and investors are realizing that recreational value on many properties is now exceeding the timber value, which in turn justifies selling the property for a substantial profit. While there are many different ways to add recreational value to a property, I’ve decided to focus on one particular property, as it’s a great example. The main goal behind the property is continuing to operate a pine plantation for investment purposes, however, have the means to hunt, fish, and enjoy the property recreationally year-round. Here are some ways this property was able to achieve this goal:

1. Created Food Plots

While it does take some time and money to prepare a food plot, the end result will benefit wildlife and keep them on your property.  This requires cutting timber, removing the stumps, liming and fertilizing the soil, and figuring out what and when to plant. The majority of these food plots are on the edges of hardwoods. This one, in particular, has been low fenced to keep the hogs out.

2. Built A Dove Field

Having a great dove field is a great way to host guests, family, and friends for entertainment. It’s a fun social event you can put on several times a year. This dove field has all the makings for being successful including a fake power line and trees for the birds to roost, water to drink, sand/gravel, and approximately 12 acres to plant.

3. Created A Duck Impoundment

Since this property sits along the eastern flyway, this duck impoundment is ideal to attract passing ducks. This impoundment is planted in June and the water level is manually controlled through a flashboard riser. The owners are able to enjoy it from early teal season in September, all the way to the end of the season in February.

4. Created Quail Habitat

This required thinning the trees back to 35-50 trees per acre. A skid steer with a grinder ate up a lot of the long-abandoned understory before Garlon (Triclopyr) was sprayed to prevent hardwood growth. These fields were burned using prescriptive fire in late February. Continuing to burn every one or two years will keep this stand clean and provide great habitat for all wildlife.

5. Building A Fishing Pond

This pond was started almost a year ago. The owners were able to reach a mutual agreement with a local contractor and the Department of Transportation. The agreement allows the two parties to have free rights to the dirt in order to finish converting a nearby roadway from two lanes into four. Once completed the landowners will have a 17.5 acre stocked pond to enjoy year-round fishing.

6. Starting A Garden

Establishing a garden requires a lot of work. However, it is very enjoyable to be able to eat what you have grown. This garden contains a mixture of fruit trees including blueberries, blackberries, peaches, limes, nectarines, oranges, apples, pears, and grapes. It also has a seasonal section that is currently planted in corn, squash, cucumbers, peppers, okra, bush beans, cantaloupes and watermelons.

While there are certainly several other recreational aspects to add to a property, I thought this property did a great job of highlighting many of them and a great example of maintaining a timber investment and year-round recreational enjoyment.

Interested in becoming an expert in recreational land transactions? Check out the RLI’s Recreational Land Real Estate LANDU course.

This post is part of the 2018 Future Leaders Committee content generation initiative. The initiative is directed at further establishing RLI as “The Voice of Land” in the land real estate industry for land professionals and landowners. For more posts like this, click here.

About the Author: Tommy Stroud Jr., ALC, is a broker with National Land Realty Tommy has served on the REALTORS© Land Institute Future Leaders Committee since 2016. He holds the esteemed Accredited Land Consultant Designation (ALC) and has an active real estate license in the states of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina. Tommy lives in St. Simons Island, GA, with his wife and two children.