Crowdfunding for Agriculture

Agriculture is a broad, ever changing field. The agricultural system is rapidly advancing to keep up with its global consumers, mainly by evolving technology to increase yields and profits. From GPS tracking devices navigating tractors with centimeter accuracy to drones checking calves in the middle of the night, technology has changed the game. A more slowly evolving factor in agriculture has been access to finance. New options, such as equity crowdfunding for agriculture, have emerged for producers to get their farm up and running, or keep their farm afloat.

Equity crowdfunding is the process by which people invest in an early-stage company not listed on a stock market, in exchange for an ownership interest in that company. If the company does well, the shareholders will profit, and if the company fails shareholders could lose some or all of their investment.

Choosing the Best Crowdfunding Option

Small scale or hobby farmers looking to raise smaller amounts of money might investigate donation-based crowdfunding. In donation-based crowdfunding, people who wish to support farm projects contribute money without much of a reward expectation besides the gratitude of the beneficiary or project creator. There are many popular donation-based crowdfunding platforms, such as GoFundMe that have supported small farms. Barnraiser is a site where donors can contribute money to small scale farmers for the social benefit and, in return, receive an incentive like a t-shirt or opportunity to tour the farm. Kiva is another site that helps farmers in developing countries with small injections of capital in the form of a micro-loan.

On the other hand, farmers who need to raise more significant amounts money to fund the launch or growth of their project can pursue equity crowdfunding. The JOBS Act of 2012 eased security regulations to legalize equity crowdfunding and allows platforms to list deals in a wide variety of investments, for example, investing in agricultural opportunities. Often, these companies go on to raise money from angel investors or venture capitalists. Two of the most popular equity crowdfunding platforms in the U.S. are Realty Shares and Seedrs. Realty Shares allows people to invest in turnkey real estate deals, such as apartment buildings. Seedr is more like an angel capital platform, which provides investors access to startup companies.

Generally, the investors in a crowdfunding project are passive, limited partners while the land-owner is the active partner, making all the decisions to include what to grow, when to plant, and where to sell the harvest, or pay a manager to do these things.

Crowdfunding for Agriculture as an Alternative to Traditional Banking

Crowdfunding for Agriculture

Now, why wouldn’t landowners just go to the bank and get a traditional loan to start up their business? There are many factors that go into this decision, including the landowner’s financial status, the desired mix of debt and equity, and the potential profitability of their farm or ranch.

Fortunately, farms aren’t nearly as leveraged as they were during the 1980s farm crisis, which saw many people lose their land. But leverage always adds an element of risk, as well as the potential for increased returns. Bringing in equity investors via crowdfunding enables a landowner or producer to realize economies of scale and reduces the risk of foreclosure during commodity downturns.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, beginning farmers are more likely than established farmers to have at least a four-year college degree. Put yourselves in the shoes of those young legacy farmers right out of college. For most people, coming out of college involves stepping into the “real world” and realizing they’re: 1) broke, and 2) in loads of debt from student loans. Debt financing is most likely the only option to choose from for young farmers to begin, but how many banks will let a young adult take off with a $500,000 loan to start their row crop operation while still drowning in student loan debt?

Other beginning farmers may not be coming right out of college, but they could be growing products that take several years to produce revenue; for example, tree crops. These farmers won’t see a profit from their investment for years. Imagine using your life savings plus a huge loan to open a restaurant, only to have to keep the place dust free and running smoothly with no customers for five or six years before you can open the doors and see a profit from your hard work. That’s the reality that new orchard growers deal with in terms of turning profit after years of hard work and care.

Then, there are those farmers who are current land owners who want to trade some of their land for cash to pay bills. Unfortunately, agriculturalists work with an element named Mother Nature who decides how much rain she wants to give, or not give, the crops, so some years may be better than others. Disease is another major risk. Thankfully, crop insurance can mitigate some of these uncontrollable events but, in the end, most of the money is coming out of the farmer’s pocket to stay afloat in hard times. On the opposite side, sometimes business is booming and farmers want to expand an existing operation. It’s like a mini start over financially but they have their practices established and just need the funds to keep up with the growing demand.

Raising Money Takes Money

Private equity firms and farmland real estate investment trusts commonly pool money from outside investors to purchase large portfolios of income producing agricultural assets. These capital raises typically involve hundreds of millions of dollars and require thorough knowledge of Securities and Exchange Commission regulations. Crowdfunding uses the same basic model, just on a smaller scale more appropriate for many producers.

Chris Rawley, CEO of Harvest Returns, an online crowdfunding marketplace for agricultural investments launching in 2017, sees an under-served middle market for agriculture finance.

“Because we’ve already done the legal and regulatory legwork and built a base of investors interested in ag, we can be a cheaper source of capital for producers who would like to raise anywhere from a few hundred thousand to a few million dollars,” Rawley explains. “We allow farmers to bring in equity investors, which keeps their debt to asset ratios lower, reducing the risks to the grower from events that might normally result in a farm foreclosure.”

The Harvest Returns platform draws investors interested in agriculture together with a wide assortment of investment agriculture products. With as little as five thousand dollars, these investors are able to own interests in farms, timberland, or orchards in different parts of the world, each with their own risk/return profile. Landowners and sophisticated investors are familiar with the benefits of investing in agriculture. Now there are ways for the average American to put a portion of their investment portfolio towards agriculture, arguably, the world’s most important industry.

American farmers need every cutting edge solution they can get today, on the production side and on the financial side. Increasingly, they’re competing not just with the farm in the next state and county, but with farms in Brazil, Russia, and other emerging countries. The agricultural industry, especially producers, must evolve to fit with today’s globalized marketplace.

This article originally appeared in the 2017 Summer Terra Firma Magazine, the official publication of the REALTORS® Land Institute.

About the Author: Allison Spence is the Digital Media & Marketing Specialist for Harvest Returns. A majority of her professional experience is in agricultural journalism and digital marketing with an emphasis in strategic communications writing.

A Quiet Strength: The Voice of Advocacy in the Wake of Devastation

Born and raised in Louisiana, Brandon Rogillio, ALC, began practicing real estate as a profession while studying economics at Southeastern Louisiana University and is now the Owner/Broker of Rogillio Real Estate in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Rogillio is known among his close friends and family for his humility and “quiet strength.” He is family man and can often be found bringing his son along to his local golf club in the little spare time he has leftover between running his own business and working for the community.

After devastating floods tore through parts of his hometown last August during a thousand-year-rain event (over 150,000 homes and structures were damaged), Brandon felt a responsibility to assist his community on a whole other level. “There isn’t anyone I know who wasn’t affected by the flooding,” said Brandon who grew up with the awaiting location of the Comite Diversion Canal, infrastructure that would’ve significantly decreased the destructive impacts of the flooding, basically in his backyard.

When approached to have this story written, Brandon was very humble about the work he has been doing on behalf of private land owners and his community, saying “I didn’t save any lives.” While that is true, his dedication and commitment to improving his community and preventing this type of flooding from happening again should not go unmentioned, as it someday could save lives.

As the only Accredited Land Consultant (ALC) and CCIM in Louisiana, his expertise in land and commercial real estate transactions as well as on legislation relating to the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) has empowered him to take action advocating on behalf of the people in his community. Brandon has strong feelings opposing the WOTUS rule, stating that “our country is founded on private property rights and land is the foundation of all real wealth in America. The government should not be able to regulate that or take it away from citizens.” He went on to explain that “government regulation has become the biggest impacting factor on land ownership; attempting to dictate everything from how people can use their land to how much their land is worth.”

Since 2014, Brandon has been chosen by the Louisiana Land Owners Association to serve on the Comite River Diversion Canal Project Task Force created by the Louisiana State Legislature. The Comite River Diversion Canal Project has been talked about for over 33 years and has now been in the “planning stages” since funding was approved by tax payers in 2000. However, the process has been slowed significantly by the US Army Corps of Engineers and Federal Emergency Management Agency’s rules because of the need to purchase mitigation land and access federal funding.

He explained that federal law that requires developers to offset damage to wetlands in one area by creating/restoring them in another. “One of the big problems we encountered was that the place they wanted to establish the wetlands is home to 75 private property owners who would have lost their homes through the government’s power of expropriation.” Brandon has worked to assist the state in successfully passing legislation to stop the government from being able to acquire the land through eminent domain, saving these families their homes.

In addition to fighting for private homeowners’ rights, Brandon is working on another front to ensure the canal is built to prevent future flooding from having the same destructive effects, reducing up to 25 percent of the damage done by flooding in the area. Brandon works closely with U.S. Representative Garret Graves, R-Baton Rouge, as the National Association of REALTORS® Federal Political Coordinator and a leader on securing funding to aid in the community’s recovery efforts. “What is so frustrating about this is that you spend billions of dollars after a disaster instead of millions of dollars before,” Graves said in a phone interview with the The Advocate news outlet last August. Brandon looks forward to working closely with Graves moving forward to continue restoring the community and advocating on their behalf.

In the land real estate industry, Brandon has used his “quiet strength” to build his own business as well as become an active leader within the REALTORS® Land Institute—a membership organization that strongly supports NAR’s efforts to advocate against legislation like WOTUS and 1031 Tax Reform on behalf of land professionals and private property owners. Last month, he was inaugurated as the 2017 National President of RLI where he plans to continue using his voice and expertise as an ALC to advocate and improve the legislative environment that so many work and live in every day. So, while he may not have “saved any lives,” Brandon’s work continues to have a huge impact on his community and the industry as a whole.

How will the elections impact land and real estate?

With Trump in power and Republicans taking the House and Senate, what does this mean for real estate practitioners and homeowners?

Did the election help or hurt real estate?
Regardless of how you feel about the national election results, it appears homeowners, realtors and the real estate industry overall will benefit from them.
“It was a great night for us,” NAR Senior Vice President Jerry Giovaniello said regarding the Realtor Party results. RPAC won over 90 percent of races in which it was involved. In addition, RPAC was also extremely successful in state and local races. For example, RPAC supported Governor-elect Gary Herbert (R-UT), Governor-elect Phil Scott (R-VT), and a constitutional amendment in Missouri to ban sales taxes on services.

Will Trump support tax reforms such as changes to the Mortgage Interest Deduction or 1031s?
Under a Trump administration, Giovaniello says that because of Trump’s knowledge of real estate and development, he will have valuable input to offer Congressional tax committees. It appears, however, that with Republicans at the helm, several tax incentives could be at risk.

When politicians say we must “simplify tax codes,” Giovaniello hears it as a euphemism for “going after home ownership incentives” like the Mortgage Interest Deduction (MID). There are already proposals on the table, and Giovaniello says they’re already talking to the authors on both sides of the aisle.

“The Realtor platform did mention that [the MID] is important, but they weren’t very specific, nor were Democrats on this,” noted Giovaniello. What does a Trump presidency mean for the MID? “We’re not exactly sure,” given that what will be prioritized won’t be clear until he is sworn in. Trump has indicated he supports the MID, however, and Giovaniello points out that Trump “knows the tax code as far as real estate is concerned, and has used it very successfully.”

1031 exchanges are in the cross-hairs, and Giovaniello says both Congress and the administration have said we should limit these tax deferrals. There are proposals from both sides to limit 1031s, with the belief that the same numbers of transactions will happen regardless. “That’s just not the case,” Giovaniello asserts and NAR and RLI will be working hard to make sure 1031s remain unchanged in the tax code and are kept as a valuable tool for investing in commercial real estate.

Will fear chill foreign investments?
Some areas are doing quite well as a result of foreign investments in the real estate markets, but will the perception regarding Trump’s attitude impact sales? Trump “has very strong opinions on immigration, so whether that leads to a chilling effect in the short term” is unclear, notes Giovaniello, reiterating that until priorities are set, we simply don’t know. “It’s something we have to be alert to,” he said. In particular, the EB-5 program has been used successfully to jump-start real estate development in all areas of the country. However, there has been a call from critics to reform the program and make it more transparent and accountable. A Trump Administration could increase the pressure to end the program or make it more difficult to use effectively by foreign investors.

Are federal regulations in the crosshairs?
The Trump Administration has described an aggressive attack on burdensome and overreaching federal regulations. For example, Trump has blasted Dodd-Frank on the election trail, and much conversation has centered around loosening Dodd-Frank regulations as the economy has improved. Trump also mentioned the Clean Air Plan, the regulation that was created to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants, and the Clean Water Plan, the regulation that sweeps in more waters of the U.S. under federal jurisdiction, as rules that he could withdraw, rescind or limit.

Will there be incentives to purchase homes?
As home ownership rates creep back up, Giovaniello doesn’t anticipate new tax credits for the purchase of a home under a Trump administration, noting a more likely scenario would be student loan refinance initiatives. Republicans believe that FHA should be available for first-time or low-income borrowers, but want to end incentives for high-income Americans. That appears to be the direction incentives will head.

Gridlock, and gobs of governors?
Will there be gridlock under a Trump presidency? Giovaniello doesn’t think that’s going away, but says “The American people voted for change. I think either party that doesn’t embrace that is going to be in bad shape.”

What will RPAC do? “Make your friends before you need them,” said Giovaniello. “We’re about to have a new, impactful class of governors, so we need to get in early now, before campaigns start,” noting they must proactively engage the candidates. The goal of the Realtor Party is to coordinate national, state, and local levels and leverage their national scale to enable those at the local level that know their communities best.

In conclusion, Giovaniello says of the election results, RPAC “did very well,” winning 90% of the races they were involved in, but are now preparing for post-election life now that the chips have fallen, by planning for the coming battle over federal and state regulations and a massive national gubernatorial race.

Riggs, RussellAuthor: Russell Riggs, RLI’s NAR Government Affairs Liaison. In his position with the National Association of REALTORS®, Russell Riggs serves in Washington, D.C., conducting advocacy on a variety of federal issues related to land.

A Passion for Ranch Real Estate With a Hint of Equine

This piece was originally featured in LAND Magazine.

Driving down a Texas highway north of the Dallas Fort Worth metroplex, you see one horse ranch after another. Visitor’s think, “I Wonder why all these horse ranches are here?” The equine enthusiast thinks, “Man I wish I could live here!” The equine industry has exploded in the North Texas corridor traveling north on Highway 377 leading out of the D-FW metroplex from Aubrey to Whitesboro. It is a constant draw for all aspects of the equine industry. There are days the trucks and trailers outnumber the cars, from the normal bustle of horsemen and horsewomen hauling their horses to a trainer, a vet, another farm, to a lesson, delivering a sale horse, buying a horse, riding with a friend, going trail riding, moving mares to another farm, competitions and even the traditional life of just going to check and gather cattle.

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North Texas and southern Oklahoma have become popular locations for the equine industry.  For years Aubrey and Pilot Point Texas were considered one of the most highly esteemed equine areas in the United States. At that time the growth of horse ranches was moving north up the Highway 377 corridor. Now the entire corridor from Aubrey to Whitesboro is populated with horse ranches. This attraction has been going on for some time. “What is it that attracts the horsemen?” you ask. The three main draws of the area for the equine community are sandy loam soil, climate and proximity.  

Sandy Loam soil is a must if you are a horseman moving to Texas. If a person isn’t knowledgeable about soil they can be fooled by location. The Sandy Loam Corridor is only thirty miles wide and runs from the Red River in Cooke and Grayson Counties, south two-hundred miles. The eastern boundary of the sandy loam soil is just a few miles east of Highway 377 and can turn to black land very quickly. The black land is good for farming but most horsemen don’t care for it and will insist on the sandy loam. The sandy loam has such great density and base that after heavy rains the soil will dry quickly. The density and base of the sandy loam soil is what makes it so incredible for footing in a riding arena and also a great composition for growing Coastal Bermuda grass. Coastal Bermuda grows best in sandy loam as it is drought tolerant and can handle heavy grazing and close defoliation. It is also the most economical forage to feed as it is readily available and the next step up in protein value is alfalfa which nearly triples in price.

Climate is another reason so many equine enthusiasts have moved to Texas. They come from all over the United States, possibly where winters are harsh and harder to keep horses trained and ready for competition. Winter in North Texas is inviting with average high temperatures in the fifties and average low temperatures in the thirties. However, there is that occasional snowfall or ice storm that will bring us to a standstill; but, never fear, the sun generally comes out and temperatures rise again in a timely manner.

Location! Location! Location! Many of the largest equine breed shows and specialized events, not to mention race tracks, are located in Fort Worth, Oklahoma City, Tulsa and surrounding areas. All of these cities are a reasonable driving distance from North Texas and on any given weekend you will find breed shows, reining, cutting, halter, working hunter, barrel racing, roping, cowhorse, mounted shooting, team roping, rodeo, racing and ranch horse versatility events at one or all of these outstanding facilities. The proximity makes it an easy day trip to spectate or compete! In November and December these facilities hold some of the most prestigious events in the Western Equine industry hosting the American Quarter Horse World Show, American Paint Horse World Show, Appaloosa World Shows, National Reining Horse Futurity, National Cutting Horse Futurity and the National Barrel Horse Futurity. That is two full months of outstanding competition from the best in the industry.

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During the fall, in these major events, you will find that the international presence is overwhelming. Nationals from Japan, Brazil, Australia, all of Europe and more will travel to the Dallas-Fort Worth area to spectate and also make purchases, both from the equine and retail side of the industry.

The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is within seventy miles and an easy drive for those flying in or out of North Texas. Equine buyers, both international and domestic, will fly to Texas to look for their next great prospect or show horse. The horse population in North Texas is unsurpassed. A serious buyer can leave the D/FW airport and drive in a one-hundred-mile radius and access Weatherford, Gainesville, Whitesboro, Tioga, Pilot Point, Aubrey, Denton — and all points in between — to view all the horses that they want in a day!

The breeding business is one entity of the equine industry that keeps traffic flowing. Each breed and discipline are well represented by world-class stallions and producing mares. The pedigrees and records from the breeding progeny are exceptional. Outstanding breeding derives prospects that are of the highest quality for sale and creates even more traffic. Equine breeding and training entities go hand-in-hand as many of the popular stallions and mares are still being shown successfully. With the modern-day technology of embryo transfer, mares can continue to be successfully shown and have recipient mares carry their embryos, which is a very big business in the area.

Horse trainers in Texas are considered to be some of the best in the world. Enter any given barn and find numerous trophies and buckles on display for World Champions, Futurity Champions, Derby Champions, National Finals Rodeo Champions, and the list goes on. The combination of horse trainers and North Texas’ amenities draw owners along with Non Pro, Youth and Amateur competitors, from afar to be a part of the equine community.

The reasons for wanting to be — and the types of people who want to be — part of this area are endless. Horse trainers who move to the area from other states will also have a following from their customers who will also make the move and buy property. Many horse owners are retirees who still have horses to compete or breed with. People who work from home will relocate to get closer to a trainer or the community. Many will purchase a second home for a place to stay when they come to ride with their trainers.

The equine industry is paramount to economic development in so many ways that have been unrecognized by society. Along with successful equine industry you have the supporting services that makes the industry successful, including but not limited to farriers, veterinarians, feed companies, tack stores, clothing stores, truck and trailer sales, and of course Realtors!

Another reason that people covet the North Texas area is the sense of community and fellowship. There is nothing like being able to share your love of horses and the sport with your neighbors and friends who appreciate and understand the industry. Many times your neighbor may have an interest in a different equine discipline since the equine industry is so vast. However, it’s the camaraderie that makes it fun to “cheer” for your neighbor. Horsemen stick together through thick and thin, win or lose. It’s knowing that if you need help your neighbor is there to help and they know horses. It’s the cowboy way of life!

I moved to Whitesboro, Texas nineteen years ago as a professional in the equine industry. I worked at a ranch as a trainer, breeding manager and ranch manager. I love the equine industry and I am still active as a professional judge for the American Quarter Horse Association, American Paint Horse Association, National Reining Horse Association and the National Snaffle Bit Association, along with being a Professional Horseman with AQHA.

I have been a REALTOR®, with Ebby Halliday REALTORS®, for the past nine years and work primarily Farm and Ranch sales. I have my own horses that I raise and show and enjoy them immensely. I will always be a part of the Equine industry that I love as a horseman and a REALTOR®. They go hand-in-hand for me today. Peers from the equine industry respect me for my knowledge in real estate. My experience has helped me become an expert in farm and ranch real estate as I understand the function of land and structures that horsemen are looking for. My true passion is ranch real estate with a hint of equine.

As my brother-in-law, who is a native Texan, says, “She wasn’t born here but she got here as fast as she could!”

lisa-moden1_bcAuthor bio: Lisa Moden is a prestigious Accredited Land Consultant of the REALTORS® Land Institute and has been a Broker for Ebby Halliday REALTORS® for over nine years.  Lisa’s experience and passion for equine has helped her become an expert in farm and ranch real estate. In addition to farm and ranch, she also specializes in lake properties and investment land.

Antlered Assets

WRITTEN BY DAN PEREZ, RLI MEMBER

COURTESY OF REALTORS® LAND INSTITUTE AND WHITETAIL PROPERTIES REAL ESTATE
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY LAND MAGAZINES

At one time the value of land was primarily based on the fertility of the soil, maturity of the timber or the minerals beneath the surface. But today there is another asset that will not show up on a property appraisal sheet, yet represents a huge value to many outdoorsman. I’m talking about the quality of the wildlife that inhabits a particular tract of land.

There is one animal in particular that generates more revenue than all God’s wild creatures on earth put together and that is the whitetail deer. When you consider the billions of dollars hunters pump into the economy every year by purchasing licenses and tags, lodging, fuel, hunting equipment, food plot equipment, recreation and utility vehicles, seed, fertilizer, camouflage clothing, attractants, and land for the single purpose of hunting the allusive whitetail deer it is absolutely astonishing! There are many businesses in the US and even entire towns in the Midwest that would go bankrupt and blown away if this majestic beast were gone.

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Just as there are farmers who pour their lives into the land in order to grow corn and beans, today there is a new generation of farmer that pours his life into the land to hold, grow and harvest the largest whitetail bucks producible in his region. I’m not referring to holding and growing big mature whitetail bucks behind a high fence. I’m talking about holding and growing wild, free ranging whitetail deer by providing premium habitat as well as an abundance of year-round high-quality food. Make no mistake, this process is time consuming and requires a lot of hard work. But when you’re passionate about whitetail deer and passionate about land it becomes the most enjoyable and rewarding work you’ll ever do.

Very often a savvy investor might purchase the least desirable home in a very up scale neighborhood. He does this because he figures, even after he spends money on improving the property he will still have far less invested in the purchase than what that property will be worth after improvements. This is a great way to purchase equity. By comparison, if you research areas that have historically produced record book bucks then employ the services of a licensed real estate land specialist to help you narrow your search, you can apply the same principals. You see, by finding a tract of land with the least desirable whitetail habitat (an example would be an old cattle ranch) in an area where big bucks are common and then by transforming that land to prime whitetail habitat you will accelerate appreciation and grow equity.

Dan Perez

These are the steps I take after purchasing that perfect property: First I start by strategically laying out the property on an aerial. I like to identify where it makes the most sense wind wise to put in food plots, bedding areas and watering holes or banks, Wild Water systems, as well as access roads, gates, and fences. As it relates to food plots, my rule of thumb is to put in at least 10 percent of the farm in food plots: Two-thirds of the plots in perennials and one-third in annuals. Next, my goal is to build cover: In the timber areas my plan is to thicken the understory as well as create densely obscure edges. I do this by feather cutting the timber along the edges of the fields and selectively hinge cutting some of the less desirable trees in the interior. This allows sunlight to reach the forest floor thus allowing new growth to sprout. Not to mention, the trees that are hinged over are still alive so now every limb grows on the sun facing side of the trunk thus creating much more dense cover at eye level. From there I work on converting cool season grassy areas into early successional plants by spraying the grassy areas with an herbicide then control burning these areas. This is a great way to provide more cover and food at same time. It is often amazing how many seeds/plants have been lying dormant for years under the thatch. If you’re not familiar with burning, spraying or cutting, don’t worry there are plenty of experts out there that you can hire. A great way to learn is to hire an expert then serve as his apprentice. You will learn far more from that experience than attending a seminar. There is an excellent book on the market right now called “A Guide to Wildlife Food Plots and Early Successional Plants.” This book is written by Craig Harper and it is the single most comprehensive book on the subject that I have ever read.

You’ve heard it before, “build it and they will come” and indeed they will. The improvements alone have already increased the value of your property, but now the key is to build a prospectus by documenting the quality of whitetails that inhabit your farm. It is amazing how in three or four short years you can really make a difference. The best way I know to build a prospectus is with trail camera pictures and by keeping an album of mature animals that have been harvested on your farm.

I’ve been involved with many farms that have sold for twice as much per acre than similar farms in the same county simply because they had documented history of producing big bucks. But at the end of the day the true value of purchasing a farm and building a quality whitetail paradise are the memories you build with your family and friends on your slice of God’s creation.

About the Author: Dan Perez is the CEO, Chief Broker, and one of the Founding Owners of Whitetail Properties Real Estate as well as the host of the ever-popular Whitetail Properties television show. The Whitetail Properties team has grown this business to over a half a billion in sales in less than nine years.  Dan is passionate about the land business and driven by hiring and developing real estate agents to become multi-million-dollar land specialist.  He is also a proud member of the REALTORS® Land Institute.