Please Wait a Moment

The Voices of Land blog

Get insight on current land trends and issues from experts across the land real estate industry.

09Sep

Why Late Summer is the Best Time to Buy Land

Farmers used to say, “If you are going to buy a farm, do it at the end of summer.” That simple country wisdom comes from years of dependence on the rhythms of Mother Nature. Experience had taught them that a farm--or any kind of land, really--will give you a better picture of its potential and the opportunities and challenges it poses at the end of the growing season but before frost. If you're looking at buying farm land, here are some things to look out for as the seasons change.

What to Look for in Late Summer and Early Fall

In late summer, the density of the foliage will show where the soil is rich as well as where it is thin and marginal. Whether it’s a stream, stock pond, spring or irrigation well, in most years you can get a true picture of what kind of water supply you can count on at that critical time between the end of a long hot summer and when the fall rains begin.

You will be able to see if there are overgrown areas that you want to reclaim or bring back into production, and the crisp cool days between the first frost of the fall and the last frost in spring are the best time for that kind of work. As fall progresses, foliage will thin and visibility will improve, allowing you to do more work in less time and prepare those areas for the next season.

"The years teach much which the days never knew." -Ralph Waldo Emerson

If soil needs to be tilled in the fall to prepare for the next crop year, you’ll have plenty of time. You’ll also have good visibility into areas where you may want to maintain or create wildlife habitat. In most areas of the country you can plant late-season food plots and get a good start on a long term wildlife plan.

Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “The years teach much which the days never knew”, and so it is with buying farm land late in the annual cycle.  You see the whole picture then: it’s the sum of the good days and bad, the rain and the sun. The way the land reacted to the previous growing season is a great indication of how it will respond to your efforts in the future.

About the Author

Richard Thompson is Executive Vice President of Sales at United Country Real Estate. He  began his career as a United Country sales associate in 1975. He later owned and operated an award winning franchise for another national franchise company before joining the United Country management team in 1988. As Executive Vice President of Sales, Richard utilizes the broad range of experience he has acquired in his 38 years in the industry to develop and execute the company’s growth plan.

About the Author

Related

Getting Top Tips from the Nation's Top Producing Agents

Getting Top Tips from the Nation's Top Producing Agents

Looking to learn from the best land agents in the industry? Check out this advice from the nation...

Read More >
The Scary Side of Land

The Scary Side of Land

It might seem like the perfect property, but there could be monsters lurking on your land. Check out...

Read More >
The Four New Realities of Washington, D.C.

The Four New Realities of Washington, D.C.

Given the unusual political environment we find ourselves in today, I thought it might be helpful to...

Read More >
Confessions of a Land Pro Roundtable Panel

Confessions of a Land Pro Roundtable Panel

Have you ever wondered how the best land brokers got to the top of their game? “Confessions of a La...

Read More >
New Water Rule Increases Confusion, Lacks Clarity

New Water Rule Increases Confusion, Lacks Clarity

A new Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule was released December 30, 2022. This definition of WO...

Read More >
How to Buy Hunting Land

How to Buy Hunting Land

There is a log to know about how to buy hunting land. The most important thing you can do, though, i...

Read More >
You need to login in order to comment